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November 2019

Talk: A New Deal Voting Rights Case: A Strategy of the Roosevelt Justice Department, 1939-1941
Eric Rauchway

November 8, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Eric Rauchway, History, UC Davis Rauchway is the author of Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt’s America (2003); The Money Makers: How Roosevelt and Keynes Ended the Depression, Defeated Fascism, and Secured a Prosperous Peace (2015); and Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash over the New Deal (2018). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Spider-Man: Far From Home

November 8, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Spider-Man: Far From Home at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Gold Show

November 8, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability: Gold Show Friday, November 8th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Rocky Horror Picture Show

November 8, 2019 @ 11:30 pm - November 9, 2019 @ 2:00 am
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showing of Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Spider-Man: Far From Home

November 11, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Spider-Man: Far From Home at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Research Focus Group Symposium: Celebration of Guru Nanak: 550th Birth Anniversary
Anshu Malhotra and Mark Juergensmeyer

November 12, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
RFG Event

This South Asia symposium celebrates the life of Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh tradition, on the 550th anniversary of his birth. The symposium will feature talks by two UCSB faculty members: Anshu Malhotra, Professor and Kundun Kaur Kapany Chair of Sikh and Punjabi Studies, will give a talk on “Guru Nanak in Popular Imagination,” and Mark Juergensmeyer, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Global Studies, will share his reflections on “Global Sikhism.” Cosponsored by the IHC South Asian Religions and Cultures Research Focus Group and the Department of Global Studies

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Screening and Panel Discussion: Surviving Home

November 12, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

SURVIVING HOME is an intimate documentary that follows four U.S. military veterans from different generations over an eight year period as they rebuild their lives after war. Interwoven with veterans' voices from across the country, their unique paths of healing and transformation shed light on longterm consequences of war and raise questions about the roots of war and societal cycles of violence. A severely injured Iraq War veteran discovers a new voice that helps heal his wounds of war, as he and his wife struggle to keep their marriage alive. A Vietnam War veteran becomes a Buddhist monk in an effort to come to terms with the carnage and dehumanization of combat. A female Iraq War veteran fights through the effects of Military Sexual Trauma to take on the U.S. government in a class action lawsuit that could improve the

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The Lawrence Badash Memorial Lecture Series: Einstein’s War: How World War I Made Relativity
Matthew Stanley

November 13, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Einstein’s ascent to worldwide celebrity was, in large part, not his own doing. The 1919 confirmation of the German Einstein’s theory of general relativity by British astronomers soon after the end of the First World War made him an emblem of how science could rise above nationalism and petty patriotism.  But in fact international science – and relativity with it – was nearly shattered by the war. It was only the dedicated efforts of pacifist scientists, chiefly A.S. Eddington, that pulled both Einstein and his theory from behind the trenches and onto the front pages of newspapers around the globe. Matthew Stanley teaches and researches the history and philosophy of science. He holds degrees in astronomy, religion, physics, and the history of science and is interested in the connections between science and the wider culture. He is the author of

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ready or Not

November 15, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ready or Not at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Wrestlemania

November 15, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: Wrestlemania Friday, November 15th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Talk: Human Simulation: Artificial Intelligence, Ethics, and the Future of the Humanities
F. LeRon Shults

November 18, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

The capacities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) are growing rapidly and new technologies are impacting society in a variety of ways, all of which raise significant ethical issues. LeRon Shults (University of Adger, Norway) argues that the Humanities are needed to help guide the ethical conversations around AI by becoming more engaged in “Human Simulation,” a new interdisciplinary approach to simulating human futures (as well as studying the past) that requires the expertise of historians, philosophers, ethicists, and other students of human nature. F. LeRon Shults, Ph.D. is a Professor at the Institute for Global Development and Social Planning at the University of Agder, Norway, and Scientific Director, Center for Modeling Social Systems. Shults, whose graduate training was in the study of religion, has been collaborating with computer modelers to demonstrate the value of computer modeling and simulation for refining and

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ready or Not

November 18, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ready or Not at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Humanities Decanted: Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands
Miroslava Chávez-García

November 20, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Humanities Decanted Chavez-Garcia

Join us for a dialogue between Miroslava Chávez-García (History) and John S.W. Park (Asian American Studies) about Chávez-García’s new book, Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. Refreshments will be served. Migrant Longing draws upon Miroslava Chávez-García’s personal collection of 300 letters exchanged by family members across the U.S.-Mexico border, illuminating what migrants experienced in their everyday lives both “here” and “there” (aqui y alla). Chávez-García uses these private, firsthand accounts to demonstrate not only how migrants struggled to maintain their sense of humanity in el norte but also how those remaining at home made sense of their changing identities in response to the loss of loved ones. Miroslava Chávez-García is Professor in the Department of History at UC Santa Barbara and holds affiliate status in the Departments of Chicana and Chicano Studies and Feminist Studies. She is the

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Research Focus Group Talk: For He Gladdens the Earth: Consent and Conjugality in the Astral State
Marko Geslani

November 20, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
3041 HSSB, HSSB, UCSB
RFG Event

Traditional discussions of gender in Hindu traditions often begin with a critique of patriarchy in orthodox Brahmanical Dharmaśāstras, followed by a turn to potential feminist resources—for example, in goddess worship, Śākta traditions, and Tantra. One effect of this line of thinking has been a relative absence within Hindu studies of reflections on gender in relation to state power, a thematic hallmark of feminist postcolonial histories of South Asia. Geslani’s talk reframes the question of gender in premodern Hindu traditions by historicizing orthodox gender theories in relation to other contemporaneous interlocutors. He focuses on royal sexual politics as depicted in the astral sciences, Jyotiḥśāstras, which he argues are crucial texts for uncovering the ideology of the medieval state. When placed in relation to ritual and omenology, an astral theory of conjugality reveals the uniquely gendered power of royal bodies to naturalize

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Critical Mass Talk: Ady Barkan: Love and Death, Hope and Resistance
Ady Barkan

November 21, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Sitting in that hotel armchair, I realized that my deadly disease was giving me newfound power at the very moment it was depriving me of so much strength. My voice was growing softer, but I was being heard by more people than ever before. My legs were disintegrating, but more and more people were following in my footsteps. Precisely because my days were numbered, people drew inspiration from my decision to spend them in resistance. Precisely because I faced such obstacles, my comrades were moved by my message that struggle is never futile. In this talk, the paralyzed political activist Ady Barkan will explore the existential questions that he has faced in the wake of his terminal diagnosis with ALS, and that the American people have faced under the Trump administration: What kind of life will our children have, and

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Talk: Economic Policy and the Civil Rights Struggle for Guaranteed Jobs
David Stein

November 22, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

David Stein, African American Studies, UCLA A UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Stein is the author of the forthcoming book, Fearing Inflation, Inflating Fears: The Civil Rights Struggle for Full Employment and the Rise of the Carceral State, 1929-1986. This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Booksmart

November 22, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Booksmart at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical

November 22, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical Friday, November 22nd at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Booksmart

November 25, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Booksmart at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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December 2019

Workshop: The Unfree Trade of an Abolitionist Colony
Manuel Covo

December 2, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
6056 HSSB, 6056 HSSB. UC Santa Barbara

Manuel Covo will discuss a chapter from his current book manuscript. The chapter, entitled “The Unfree Trade of an Abolitionist Colony,” explores the economic challenges facing Saint-Domingue in the aftermath of abolition and argues that the war context and the food dependency had long-lasting consequences for the new Haitian society. The text will be pre-circulated; for a copy, email rmaclean@ucsb.edu. Sponsored by the IHC’s Slavery, Captivity, and the Meaning of Freedom Research Focus Group

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood

December 2, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time in...Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Talk: Hamlet Sings!: The Operatic Life of Shakespeare’s Dane from the Baroque Era to the 21st Century
William Germano

December 5, 2019 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

William Germano, Professor of English at Cooper Union, is the author of Getting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books; From Dissertation to Book; Eye Chart, among others. Prof. Germano will present a part of his current project tentatively titled, Shakespeare at the Opera: A History of Impossible Projects. *Prof. Germano will also hold a publication workshop on revising academic writing, which is mostly tailored for junior faculty who work on their first book projects. If interested, please RSVP with Abdulhamit Arvas . Please note there is very limited seating for this workshop and the priority will be given to junior faculty. It is on December 5th, Thursday, 1.30-3 pm at the TD seminar room. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, Department of Theater and Dance, Early Modern Center, the Dean of Humanities and Fine

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Humanities Decanted: Borges, Buddhism and World Literature: A Morphology of Renunciation Tales
Dominique Jullien

December 5, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Dominique Jullien (French and Comparative Literature) and Sowon Park (English) about Jullien’s new book, Borges, Buddhism and World Literature: A Morphology of Renunciation Tales. Refreshments will be served. Jullien’s latest book follows the renunciation story in Borges and beyond, arguing for its centrality as a Borgesian compositional trope and as a Borgesian prism for reading a global constellation of texts. The renunciation story at the heart of Buddhism, that of a king who leaves his palace to become an ascetic, fascinated Borges because of its cross-cultural adaptability and metamorphic nature, and because it resonated so powerfully across philosophy, politics and aesthetics. From the story and its many variants, Borges’s essays formulated a 'morphological' conception of literature (borrowing the idea from Goethe), whereby a potentially infinite number of stories were generated by transformation of a

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Research Focus Group Symposium: Ancient Archives and Public History: Dispatches from the Papyrological Lost and Found
Roberta Mazza and Anna Uhlig

December 5, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Old Mission Santa Barbara, 2201 Laguna Street

Book of the Dead of the Priest of Horus, Imhotep (Imuthes), ca. 332-200 B.C. From the poetry of Sappho to the New Testament, texts written on papyrus have been preserved for millennia by arid conditions in Egypt, excavated, and collected in archives. This timely colloquium examines the legal and ethical problems surrounding these papyrological archives. Roberta Mazza will tell the story of how ancient papyri of unknown provenance were acquired by the Museum of the Bible and are now at the center of a scandal and police investigation. Anna Uhlig will discuss how Egyptian mummies have been destroyed in the quest to "recover" ancient texts and how we can use the Tebtunis archive at UC Berkeley to honor the "missing mummies" lost to us in the name of scholarship. Roberta Mazza is Lecturer in Greco-Roman Material Culture at the University

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood

December 6, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time in...Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show

December 6, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show Friday, December 6th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Performance: Lucinda y las Flores de la Nochebuena (UCSB Opera performance)
UCSB Opera Outreach Program, directed by Associate Professor Dr. Isabel Bayrakdarian

December 8, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Karl Geiringer Hall, Building 531, University of California, Santa Barbara

UCSB Associate Professor Isabel Bayrakdarian will direct undergraduate students from UCSB’s Opera Outreach Program in a free community performance of Evan Mack’s 2016 children’s opera Lucinda y las Flores de la Nochebuena on Sunday, December 8, 2019 at 6 pm in Karl Geiringer Hall on the UC Santa Barbara campus. The 45-minute one-act opera is based on the Mexican folk tale of the same name that tells the story of how the poinsettia became a meaningful symbol of the holiday season. This project is supported by the UCSB Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (IHC) Collaborative Arts Teaching Program Award and cosponsored by UC Santa Barbara Department of Music

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Talk: The Emotional Landscape of Revolution: Russia 1905-1925
Mark D. Steinberg

December 16, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

In this talk, I consider the shifting, tumultuous, and consequential field of emotions that contemporaries perceived as defining public life in Russia during its “revolutionary” age. I take this story from the stillborn revolution of 1905, into global war and transnational revolution, through a bloody civil war into the first years of peaceful “socialist construction.” Often categorized as “the public mood,” a trope in Russian journalism and politics in the first half of the 20th century, these emotions ranged from what was described as dark anguish to joyful enthusiasm. Texts to be considered include working-class poetry, public art, appeals, petitions, and memoirs. Topics range from street protests to efforts to create liberated new men and women, including sexually. Key elements woven into this story of revolution and feeling include religion, violence, and language. I link all of these stories and

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January 2020

Information Sessions: Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program

January 9, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Thursday, January 9, 4:00-5:00 PM | 6020 HSSB Thursday, January 16, 9:00-10:00 AM | 6020 HSSB Join the IHC and current Public Humanities Fellows to learn more about the Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program.  Explore the course requirements, hear about paid internship and fellow-designed community project opportunities, and find out more about the capstone project. Light refreshments will be served.

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Talk: “Send My Body to the Medical College”: Alternative Afterlives in Turn of the Century America
Susan Lederer

January 9, 2020 @ 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

In 1876 American and English newspapers reported the extraordinary will made by an American woman living in London. Inspired by Bentham’s 1832 bequest of his body, Susan Fletcher Smith approached the Royal College of Surgeons with the proposal that, upon her death, her body be “completely dissected in the most thorough manner known to science.” Moreover, she stipulated that preference be given to persons of the female sex who wished to inspect the body in the various stages of dissection. The President of the College agreed to accept her proposal. Smith’s donation was one of some 450 reported in the press in the years between 1870 and 1940. This talk explores how donating one’s remains to a medical institution was transformed in this period from a bizarre and macabre eccentricity into an exemplar of enlightened corporeal philanthropy. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities

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Critical Mass Talk: Nations in Crisis, People in Crisis: Connecting Upheaval
Jared Diamond

January 15, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd
Jared Diamond

IHC Director Susan Derwin asked Jared Diamond, UCLA Professor of Geography, a few questions about his work in light of the current pandemic. Read his comments here. Nations that successfully navigate crises do so by making selective changes to their identities and actions. When individuals experience crises—mid-life, financial, health, relationship—they may also adopt selective changes to overcome the situation. But some individuals, like some nations, are better at navigating upheaval than others. By drawing on the factors that counselors and psychotherapists have identified that affect the likelihood of overcoming personal crisis, Diamond will examine the extent to which crisis response on the individual scale helps us to understand the outcomes of recent and impending national and world crises. Jared Diamond is professor of Geography at UCLA and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Collapse, and other books. Copies of Diamond's books

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Information Sessions: Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program

January 16, 2020 @ 9:00 am - 10:00 am

Thursday, January 9, 4:00-5:00 PM | 6020 HSSB Thursday, January 16, 9:00-10:00 AM | 6020 HSSB Join the IHC and current Public Humanities Fellows to learn more about the Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program.  Explore the course requirements, hear about paid internship and fellow-designed community project opportunities, and find out more about the capstone project. Light refreshments will be served.

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Lighthouse

January 17, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of The Lighthouse at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Lighthouse

January 20, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of The Lighthouse at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Humanities Decanted: Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou
Roberto Strongman

January 23, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Roberto Strongman (Black Studies) and Jennifer Tyburczy (Feminist Studies) about Strongman’s new book, Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou. Refreshments will be served. In Queering Black Atlantic Religions, Roberto Strongman examines Haitian Vodou, Cuban Lucumí/Santería, and Brazilian Candomblé to demonstrate how religious rituals of trance possession allow humans to understand themselves as embodiments of the divine. In these rituals, the commingling of humans and the divine produces gender identities that are independent of biological sex. As opposed to the Cartesian view of the spirit as locked within the body, the body in Afro-diasporic religions is an open receptacle. Showing how trance possession is a primary aspect of almost all Afro-diasporic cultural production, Strongman articulates transcorporeality as a black, trans-Atlantic understanding of the human psyche, soul, and gender as multiple, removable, and

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Symposium: Drawing Diversity: Identity, Organizing, and Imagining in Comics and Graphic Narratives
Frederick Luis Aldama

January 24, 2020 @ 10:00 am - 5:30 pm

“Drawing Diversity” seeks to highlight the research and ideas of comix scholars who research questions of power, representation, and identity in comics. The symposium hopes to engage the politics and poetics of representing the intersections of race, nationhood, gender, and sexuality, among other social locations, through the comics form. Some central questions we will explore include: • What are the ethics and politics of visual representation amid the violent realities of white supremacy, heteropatriarchy, imperialism and (neo)colonialism? • How can comics represent historical traumas both past and present? • Can the visual/verbal incite new modes of identification, empathy, and ethics in narrative? • What possibilities for activism (or artivism) exist within comics, popular culture, and literary studies across cultures and geographies? • How does graphic narrative (mis)represent individuals and communities? • What is the place of graphic narrative in a

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Terminator: Dark Fate

January 24, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Terminator: Dark Fate at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Terminator: Dark Fate

January 27, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Terminator: Dark Fate at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Black History Month Celebration: Harriet

January 31, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Harriet at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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February 2020

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Black History Month Celebration: Harriet

February 3, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Harriet at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Poetry Reading: Prodigal: New and Selected Poems, 1976-2014
Linda Gregerson

February 6, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Linda Gregerson is the Caroline Walker Bynum Distinguished University Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Michigan. She is an internationally recognized scholar in American and British literature, and she is also the author of six award-winning books of poetry. She was named as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her creative and scholarly works have been supported by the National Humanities Center and the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as by the Guggenheim, Mellon, and Rockefeller Foundations. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is honored to invite Professor Gregerson to our campus. For our first hour, she will be reading from her most recent book of poems, Prodigal: New and Selected Poems, 1976-2014 (2015), and then we will open

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Jojo Rabbit

February 7, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Jojo Rabbit at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical

February 7, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical Friday, February 7 at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Jojo Rabbit

February 10, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Jojo Rabbit at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Valentine’s Day Celebration: Student Choice Film

February 14, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of TBA at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Anti-Valentine’s Day Show

February 14, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Anti-Valentine's Day Show Friday, February 14 at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Rocky Horror Picture Show

February 14, 2020 @ 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showing of The Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight

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Critical Mass Talk: Art as Compass and Catalyst for Change
Aaron Huey

February 20, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Aaron Huey Critical Mass Talk

Amplifier.org is "a nonprofit design lab that builds art and media experiments to amplify the most important movements of our times." In this lecture the Founder of Amplifier will speak on the power of art at threshold moments, recounting visual campaigns like We The People, which flooded the streets for the Women's March and 2017 Presidential Inauguration protests. Amplifier believes that in times of uncertainty—in times like these, when fear and misinformation attempt to divide us—that art is more than beauty or decoration: It is a weapon and a shield. Art has the power to wake people up and serve as a catalyst for real change. It is a megaphone for important but unheard voices that need amplifying. It is a bridge that can unite movements with shared values in ways other mediums cannot. Art gives us symbols to gather

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LISO Research Focus Group Talk: John J. Gumperz Memorial Lecture
Kira Hall

February 21, 2020 @ 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
1205 Education, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, UCSB

Accent, Interaction, and Intimacy on the Autism Spectrum Kira Hall University of Colorado Boulder If intimacy is collaboratively produced in interaction, as discourse analysts argue, then how do individuals with atypical interactional behaviors achieve it? This paper addresses a sociolinguistic practice noted for individuals on the autism spectrum but rarely analyzed: the sustained adoption of non-local dialect features. For sociolinguists who view second dialect acquisition as a social achievement importantly related to identity, this practice presents a paradox: How do individuals with such a purportedly “asocial” syndrome accomplish an activity that is intensely social? To address this question, the talk draws from data collected by a team of linguists and anthropologists at the University of Colorado Boulder for a multi-year project on accent imitation in the autism spectrum. Focusing on the life narrative of an autistic man raised in Montgomery,

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ford v Ferrari

February 21, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ford v Ferrari at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Improvised Cinema Show

February 21, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Improvised Cinema Show Friday, February 21 at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ford v Ferrari

February 24, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ford v Ferrari at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Research Focus Group Talk: Voices of Ancient Palmyra: Reflections
Carly Maris

February 27, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
6056 HSSB, 6056 HSSB. UC Santa Barbara

“Voices of Ancient Palmyra” began as an online public humanities project that explored how different publics engaged with ancient history and the destruction of ancient objects. The original goal was to encourage people of all ages and education levels to artistically rewrite words from ancient Palmyrene inscriptions, while learning about the history of the site. Artistic recreations were then uploaded to the website and social media. The project became a museum exhibition at the Fullerton Museum of Art at CSU San Bernardino, for which local artists created pieces that engaged with and reacted to ancient inscriptions. The project had three different phases or iterations: the digital exhibition, the physical art exhibition, and the immersive experience. Each phase had unique complications that arose in the process of bringing various publics, the museum, and the academy into conversation. In “Reflections” Maris explores

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Conference: Sal Castro Memorial Conference on the Emerging Historiography of the Chicano Movement

February 28, 2020 @ 8:30 am - February 29, 2020 @ 6:00 pm

The Sal Castro conference will bring together 28 participants to present their research on a variety of topics on the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. The Chicano Movement was the largest and most widespread civil rights and empowerment in the history of Mexican Americans. There is a renewed interest in the Chicano Movement by historians and other scholars and this will be showcased at the conference. Sponsored by Office of the Chancellor, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Office of the Dean of Social Sciences, Chicano Studies Institute, Office of the Graduate Dean, Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, Equal Opportunity & Discrimination, Educational Opportunity Program, Luis Leal Endowed Chair, Las Maestras Center, Department of History, Latin America & Iberian Studies

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Conference: Beyond Academia

February 28, 2020 @ 9:45 am - February 29, 2020 @ 6:15 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

The Beyond Academia conference at UC Santa Barbara is an annual event aimed at preparing graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in all stages and disciplines to pursue a wide range of career options after graduate school. The conference offers attendees the opportunity to interact with professionals who have established careers outside the professoriate in industry, government, administration, nonprofits, and more. Come learn about potential careers in a variety of sectors and specialties outside of and alongside academia. Whether you are on the job market or just starting to explore career options, the Beyond Academia conference will help you create an action plan for your future. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center; UCSB Career Services; UCSB Graduate Division; Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Department; Materials Department; Mechanical Engineering Department; Computer Science Department; Electrical and Computer Engineering Department; Graduate Student Association; Communication

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Conference: Queer Crossings, Unruly Locales, 1500-1800

February 28, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - February 29, 2020 @ 5:00 pm
Mosher Alumni Hall, Mosher Alumni House, UC Santa Barbara

The UCSB Early Modern Center (EMC) warmly invites you to our upcoming annual conference, “Queer Crossings, Unruly Locales, 1500-1800,” scheduled for Friday, February 28th and Saturday, February 29th here at UCSB in Alumni Hall of Mosher Alumni House. The conference is free and open to the public, and all are welcome! Our keynote speakers are Dr. Melissa E. Sanchez (University of Pennsylvania) and Dr. Rajani Sudan (Southern Methodist University). Visit the following link to view the conference schedule, which also includes information about the conference, our keynote speakers, and pre-conference events that may be of interest: https://emc.english.ucsb.edu/queer-crossings-unruly-locales-1500-1800/ Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, College of Letters and Science, IHC New Sexualities Research Focus Group, Department of History, and the Department of French and Italian

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Talk: Missing Babies and Tacit Tolerance of Infanticide in Early Modern Europe
Sara Beam

February 28, 2020 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
4080 HSSB, HSSB UCSB

Aggressive criminal prosecution of unwed mothers who killed their newborns in early modern Europe (1550-1750) has led historians to assume that Europe was less tolerant of illegitimacy and infanticide than other pre-modern societies, including China and Japan. New research throws this assumption into question. In early modern Geneva, authorities often turned a blind eye to the untimely deaths and abandonment of unwanted bastards. These findings suggest that Europeans took a more practical approach to managing fertility than we had thought. Sara Beam, Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Victoria (Canada), is the author of numerous works on judicial violence, including torture, in early modern Europe, with a special expertise on the city of Geneva. She is especially interested in the definition and prosecution of early modern “women’s” crimes, including infanticide and adultery. She is completing

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Uncut Gems

February 28, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Uncut Gems at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Leap Year Show

February 28, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Leap Year Show Friday, February 28 at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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March 2020

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Uncut Gems

March 2, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Uncut Gems at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Research Focus Group Talk: Amritlal Thakkar: A Gandhian “Intervention” in the “Tribal Question”
Maharshi Vyas

March 4, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
3041 HSSB, HSSB, UCSB
RFG event

Debates on the “tribal question” constituted an important part of intellectual politics during the late colonial period in South Asia, especially during the decades leading to the Partition and Independence in 1947. Present-day "reservation" (affirmative action) policies for the "Scheduled Tribes" owe much to these debates. The “tribal question” was framed as a question that attempted to resolve how the British colonial government, and later the post-colonial Indian government, should engage groups of tribal communities that live in geospatially and socially marginalized conditions. This talk provides a critical analysis of the role of Amritlal Vithaldas Thakkar as an important interlocutor in these debates. Thakkar, a Gandhian activist, was hailed by many of his contemporaries as an exemplary champion of social service to the depressed castes and tribal communities. His intellectual battles with two other prominent figures—Bhimrao Ambedkar and Verrier Elwin—served

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Gagaku Workshops: Court Music and Dance from Japan

March 5, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - March 6, 2020 @ 5:00 pm

Gagaku (music, songs, and dances from the imperial court of Japan) is the oldest continuously performed genre of music in the world, dating back in Japan to at least the seventh century. This series of workshops offers a rare opportunity to experience directly this fantastic kind of music and dance and its unique musical instruments. The workshops are taught by former directors of the Gagaku orchestra at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo and by leading musicians from Japan. Please see the event flyer for workshop times and locations. Organized by Fabio Rambelli (UCSB) Produced by Naoyuki Manabe Sponsored by Nora McNeely Hurley, Michael Hurley, and the Manitou Fund Co-sponsored by: ISF Endowed Chair in Shinto Studies (UCSB), Department of Religious Studies (UCSB), Department of Theater and Dance (UCSB), East Asia Center (UCSB), Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies (UCSB),

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Talk: The Class Politics of Inflation and Postwar Wage and Price Controls
Andrew Elrod

March 6, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Andrew Elrod is a PhD candidate in the History Department at UC Santa Barbara. He is a historian of American capitalism and economic thought who has published in the New Labor Forum, Jacobin, and Dissent. His talk will examine the responses of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations to the problems of inflation and price controls in the 1960s and 1970s. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Parasite

March 6, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Parasite at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Course Evals Show

March 6, 2020 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Course Evals Show Friday, March 6 at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Parasite

March 9, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Parasite at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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POSTPONED Conference: Sino-Japanese Studies in the Twenty-First Century
with keynote lecture by Joshua Fogel, York University

March 14, 2020 @ 10:00 am - March 15, 2020 @ 2:00 pm

This conference has been postponed and will be rescheduled at a later date. Email William Fleming for more information (wfleming@eastasian.ucsb.edu)   This conference is presented by the Transregional East Asia Research Focus Group and will feature a keynote lecture by Joshua Fogel, York University, and panels on Intellectual History, Literary Culture, and Japanese Sinology. Saturday, March 14th, 10:00 AM-5:30 PM, and Sunday, March 15th, 9:30 AM-2:00 PM, at the McCune Conference Room, 6th floor, Humanities and Social Sciences Building Conference participants include: XIAOWEI ZHENG (UC Santa Barbara) WILLIAM FLEMING (UC Santa Barbara) JOSHUA FOGEL (York University) ANDRE HAAG (University of Hawai'i) CHUNLING PENG (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences) DAIGENGNA DUOER (UC Santa Barbara) MANUEL COVO (UC Santa Barbara) NAOKI YAMAMOTO (UC Santa Barbara) HANGPING XU (UC Santa Barbara) JING WANG (UC Santa Barbara) WILLIAM HEDBERG (Arizona State University) XIAORONG LI

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April 2020

POSTPONED Conference: Climate Fictions
Keynote Presenter John Shoptaw

April 18, 2020 @ 10:00 am - April 19, 2020 @ 4:30 pm

THIS CONFERENCE HAS BEEN POSTPONED AND WILL BE RESCHEDULED AT A LATER DATE. EMAIL CHRISTENE D'ANCA FOR MORE INFORMATION (christene_danca@ucsb.edu)   As climate change has become a central topic of discussion, laced with the uncertainty of tomorrow, the UCSB Graduate Center for Literary Research has invited scholars from a variety of disciplines to reframe their conversations with a focus on this ubiquitous topic as it has been interpreted in literary fiction, as well as within the arts. Originally coined by Dan Bloom, Climate-Fiction, popularly known as Cli-Fi, is a type of fiction that explores what the earth might become if climate change continues at its current rate, and specifically if humans do not intervene to save the planet. As many successful authors, such as Margaret Atwood, T. C. Boyle, Amitav Ghosh, Ursula Le Guin, Lydia Millet, David Mitchell, and Leslie Marmon

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May 2020

POSTPONED Talk: “Hysteric Affirmation”: Language, Literature, and the Economy in Contemporary German Fiction
Lilla Balint

May 5, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

THIS EVENT WILL BE RESCHEDULED. SIGN UP FOR OUR EVENTS MAILING LIST FOR EVENT UPDATES.   Lilla Balint is Assistant Professor of German in the Department of German at University of California, Berkeley. She specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century German literature, culture, and intellectual history in its broader comparative contexts. At UC Berkeley, she is affiliated with the Institute for European Studies and the Jewish Studies Program. Currently, she is at work on a book manuscript, “Ruins of Utopia: History, Memory, and the Novel after 1989,” that exposes the afterlife of socialism in contemporary literature. This comparative and multilingual study puts authors from Central Europe in dialogue to investigate how historical fiction after 1989 reconstructs the Cold War East. Located at the intersections of narrative poetics, cultural history, and memory studies, the book analyzes how novelists from diverse linguistic and

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Symposium: Healing/Arts: Health Activism, Creative Practice, & the Medical Humanities
Kelly Gluckman, Leora Fridman, Johanna Hedva, Patty Berne

May 14, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Healing/Arts is a free, virtual symposium that brings together creative practitioners from literary studies, medical humanities, disability justice, and performance for a series of talks and workshops on the relationship between the arts and health activism. Featured facilitators Kelly Gluckman, Leora Fridman, Johanna Hedva, and Patty Berne will examine the role the creative arts might play in critiquing the institutional configurations of American healthcare and the normative imperatives underlying idealized notions of health. And they will explore the arts’ capacity to help us reimagine and produce individual and collective well-being by inviting participants to experiment with modes of communal engagement including somatic exercises, writing, discussion, performance, and art making. Please visit https://healingartssymposium.wordpress.com/ for more information. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, Humanities and Fine Arts Division Office of the Dean, Graduate Center for Literary Research, Department of English Literature and

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August 2020

Research Focus Group Discussion: The New Human

August 1, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

This meeting at the 2020 Cognitive Science Society 2020 conference will explore the ways in which cognitive science is reshaping of key assumptions about the human mind. Literary scholars working on mental phenomena at ‘Literature and Mind’ center at UCSB note that, currently, progress in fields such as data driven machine learning and computer vision is providing unprecedented opportunities for the prospect of human-level artificial intelligence. But, as has been argued in computer science, the computational theory of mind, which claims that mental processes are computational processes, is insufficient to fully account for biologically evolved intelligence. For machine intelligence to take us all the way to human-level intelligence, we need explanations that span multiple levels of organization (neural, somatic, social) that take shape at multiple time-scales (evolution, development, life-long learning). The goal of this group is to provide a virtual

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October 2020

Conference: Realisms in East Asian Performing Arts

October 1, 2020 @ 2:00 pm - October 3, 2020 @ 8:00 pm

Realisms in East Asian Performing Arts proposes new considerations of realism on stage. Since its association with 19th-century innovations in European and American drama, theatrical realism has largely remained limited to Euro-American definitions. We explore conventions of realism in culturally-specific locations and times across East Asia, articulating alternative histories of realism that extend from the premodern into the present. Through our individual inquiries, we aim to broaden the term’s analytic power and shed collective light on the diversity and versatility of this important representational mode. The conference will end with a reading of the early twentieth-century play The Son, by pioneer of modern Japanese theatre Osanai Kaoru. Translated into English by David Jortner, performed by LAUNCH PAD of UCSB's Department of Theater and Dance. Conference Participants: Jyana Browne (University of Maryland), Xing Fan (University of Toronto), Man He (Williams College), David Jortner (Baylor University), Jieun Lee

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Inaugural Lecture: Living Democracy in Capitalism’s Shadow: Creative Labor, Black Abolitionists, and the Struggle to End Slavery
John Majewski

October 8, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link In the two decades before the Civil War, a new type of capitalism developed in the northern United States that stressed mass education, widespread innovation, and new markets for art and design. For Black abolitionists, the changing northern economy presented new opportunities to highlight the evils of slavery. While continuing to attack slavery’s physical cruelty, Black abolitionists in the 1840s and 1850s increasingly highlighted the “mental darkness” of slavery, focusing on the systematic denial of literacy, learning, and creativity. Through their own creative labor, Black abolitionists made a compelling case for racial equality. The fate of Black creative labor after the Civil War, though, demonstrated the limits of using creativity as a way of obtaining citizenship, and raises important questions about how we in the 21st century “live democracy”

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Humanities Decanted: Transgenerational Remembrance: Performance and the Asia-Pacific War in Contemporary Japan
Jessica Nakamura

October 13, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm
Jessica Nakamura

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a dialogue between Jessica Nakamura (Theater and Dance) and Catherine Nesci (French and Italian, Comparative Literature) about Nakamura’s new book, Transgenerational Remembrance: Performance and the Asia-Pacific War in Contemporary Japan. Audience Q&A will follow. In Transgenerational Remembrance, Jessica Nakamura investigates the role of artistic production in the commemoration and memorialization of the Asia-Pacific War (1931–1945) in Japan since 1989. During this time, survivors of Japanese aggression and imperialism, previously silent about their experiences, have sparked contentious public debates about the form and content of war memories. Working from theoretical frameworks of haunting and ethics, Nakamura develops an analytical lens based on the Noh theater ghost. Noh emphasizes the agency of the ghost and the dialogue between the dead and the living. Integrating her Noh-inflected analysis into

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Research Focus Group Symposium: India “Right”: Making and Unmaking Indian Citizenship

October 14, 2020 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
RFG Event

The Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) was passed by the Indian Parliament on December 11, 2019. It amends the Citizenship Act of 1955 and creates an easier path for acquiring Indian citizenship for persecuted religious minorities—Hindu, Sikh, Jain, Buddhist, Christian, and Parsi—from Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan who entered India before or on December 13, 2014. The Act does not encompass other (non-Islamic) neighboring countries, nor does it consider other persecuted minorities—for example, the Rohingya Muslims of Myanmar, the Ahmadiya and Shia of Pakistan, or the Tamils of Sri Lanka. While the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) was able to pass the Citizenship Amendment Bill (CAB) through Parliament without a hitch, it was unprepared for the massive protests against the Act that soon followed in a number of places in India. The protests were spearheaded by students from across universities in India.

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The 2020 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence: Jesmyn Ward

October 20, 2020 @ 5:00 pm - 6:15 pm
Jesmyn Ward by Beowulf Sheehan

Note: The full-length video recording of this event is available for UCSB affiliates through December 31, 2021. Please email events@ihc.ucsb.edu if you are a UCSB affiliate and would like to watch the video. Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a conversation between Jesmyn Ward, 2020 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence, and IHC Director Susan Derwin. Audience Q&A will follow. MacArthur Genius and two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward has been called “the new Toni Morrison” (American Booksellers Association). In 2017, she became the first woman and first person of color to win the National Book Award twice—joining the ranks of William Faulkner, Saul Bellow, John Cheever, Philip Roth, and John Updike. Her writing, which encompasses fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, is “raw, beautiful, and dangerous” (The New York Times Book Review).

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Research Focus Group Discussion: Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution

October 20, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Disability Studies RFG

REGISTER NOW In honor of National Disability Employment Awareness Month and the thirtieth anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Disability Studies Initiative is joining the Carsey-Wolf Center and the UCSB Library to host a virtual discussion with the directors of Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution (2020). In the early 1970s, teenagers with disabilities faced a future shaped by isolation, discrimination, and institutionalization. Located in the Catskills, New York, ramshackle Camp Jened exploded those confines. Jened was the teens’ freewheeling utopia, a place where summertime sports, smoking, and make-out sessions awaited everyone; campers experienced liberation and full inclusion as human beings. Their bonds endured as many migrated west to Berkeley, California, a hotbed of activism where friends from Camp Jened realized that disruption, civil disobedience, and political participation could change the future for millions. Co-directors and

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Living Democracy Talk: Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited
Lizabeth Cohen

October 22, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities—in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the federal government responsible for funding more affordable housing and other urban investments, rather than turn to the private sector. Cohen will revisit this history by following the long career of Edward J. Logue, who worked to revitalize New Haven in the 1950s, became the architect of the “New Boston” in the 1960s, and later led innovative organizations in New York at the state level and in the South Bronx. She will

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Research Focus Group Discussion: Let’s Talk Mediterranean: A Conversation with Sharon Kinoshita and Brian Catlos
Sharon Kinoshita and Brian Catlos

October 23, 2020 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

REGISTER NOW On October 23, Sharon Kinoshita and Brian Catlos will join us for a conversation on the state of premodern Mediterranean studies. Together, Kinoshita and Catlos run the Mediterranean Seminar, an interdisciplinary research group that focuses on Mediterranean cultures and societies, and also the role of the Mediterranean in historical narratives of "the West." The seminar, which hosts a range of events (symposia, colloquia, workshops), has played a vital role in promoting Mediterranean studies in the United States. In recent years, they have co-edited the groundbreaking volume, Can We Talk Mediterranean?: Conversations on an Emerging Field in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Palgrave, 2017). Sharon Kinoshita (Professor of Literature at UC Santa Cruz) is a specialist in Old French literature, medieval Mediterranean studies, medieval globalism, and postcolonial theories. She is the author of Medieval Boundaries: Rethinking Difference in Old

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Research Focus Group Meeting: The Future of Humanity from a Sustainability Point of View
Sangwon Suh

October 26, 2020 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

REGISTER HERE In this meeting, Professor Sangwon Suh (Bren School) will present research in progress about possible futures of human nature as it relates to selfishness and sustainability. This will be followed by discussion, moderated by Aili Pettersson Peeker. The meeting is open to all but we do ask you to register to attend so that we can spend our time in the meeting as productively as possible. After you've registered, you will receive a Zoom invitation as well as a 1,000-word document introducing the research that we ask that you read before the meeting. Please see the information sheet "Sustainability and the New Human IHC Research Focus Group Meetings" available on our IHC webpage for more information about this and the structure of the meeting. Sangwon Suh is a professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management

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Humanities Decanted: Antigone Rising: The Subversive Power of the Ancient Myths
Helen Morales

October 27, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a dialogue between Helen Morales (Classics) and Vilna Bashi-Treitler (Black Studies) about Morales’ new book, Antigone Rising: The Subversive Power of the Ancient Myths. Audience Q&A will follow. A witty, inspiring reckoning with the ancient Greco-Roman myths and their legacy, from what they can illuminate about #MeToo to the radical imagery of Beyoncé. The picture of classical antiquity most of us learned in school is framed in certain ways -- glossing over misogyny while omitting the seeds of feminist resistance. Even today, myths are still informing harmful practices like diet culture and school dress codes. But in Antigone Rising, classicist Helen Morales reminds us that the myths have subversive power because they can be told -- and read -- in different ways. Through these stories,

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Living Democracy Talk: From the Embers of Crisis: Creating Equitable and Deliberative Democracy
Archon Fung

October 29, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Archon Fung Talk

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link At a moment when American Democracy was characterized by record levels of political division, inequality, and institutional distrust, it was hit by the perfect storm of the COVID-19 health crisis, an economic crisis of soaring unemployment and economic dislocation, and a civic crisis of reckoning with deep racism and police abuse. What would it take to create from the embers of these crises a deeper, more egalitarian and deliberative democracy in America? Many lay their hopes in a change of Presidential administration in the coming election. But long before Donald Trump, our government had already failed to create a system that shared the fruits of prosperity justly. Our government was unresponsive to the wishes of many Americans, especially people of color and non-wealthy Americans. A return to the pre-Trump

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Research Focus Group Talk: “Cripistemologies of Pain”
Travis Chi Wing Lau

October 30, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Disability Studies RFG

REGISTER NOW Drawing together insights from disability theory, literary studies, and interdisciplinary pain studies, Lau's lecture contributes to what Alyson Patsavas has called "cripistemologies of pain" that prompt us to think from the position of pained lived experience to imagine radically different models of care that move beyond the reductive binary of either amelioration or annihilation of pain. Can we theorize a standpoint (or what Rosemarie Garland-Thomson has called "sitpoint") theory of pain that attends to its crip and queer chronicities while also working toward new forms of care and interdependence? Travis Chi Wing Lau's research and teaching focus on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British literature and culture, health humanities, and disability studies. Alongside his scholarship, Lau frequently writes for venues of public scholarship like Synapsis: A Journal of Health Humanities, Lapham's Quarterly, Public Books, and The Los Angeles Review of

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November 2020

Critical Mass Talks and Staged Reading: On Collecting and Hoarding
William Davies King and Rebecca Falkoff

November 5, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 8:30 pm

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS: 4:00 - 5:15 PM Talks: William Davies King and Rebecca Falkoff 7:00 - 8:00 PM Staged Reading: Collections of Nothing Enough is Enough EVENT DETAILS: Talks: William Davies King and Rebecca Falkoff The Creative Edge of Collecting William Davies King has spent a lifetime collecting nothing in a way he brought to light in his 2008 book Collections of Nothing. His collecting of such things as Cheez-It boxes, “Place Stamp Here” squares, hotel door cards, and the little stickers you find on fruit runs into the tens of thousands of items, all on the low edge of the valueless and the ephemeral. But he has also spent a lifetime engaged with the arts–drama, performance art, collage–and he has explored the ways the activity of the collector, who thinks through the world, connects to the work of the

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Research Focus Group Discussion with Amanda Lucia about Her Book Reflections of Amma
Amanda Lucia

November 5, 2020 @ 5:20 pm - 6:30 pm

ATTEND DISCUSSION The meeting will be hosted by our South Asia RFG colleague William Elison, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at UCSB, as part of his seminar on Religion and Ideology in Modern India: Current Approaches. This seminar session will feature a discussion with Amanda Lucia about her book, Reflections of Amma: Devotees in a Global Embrace (2014), which provides an ethnographic analysis of transnationalism and gender in a global movement centered around Amritanandamayi, who is celebrated as Amma, “Mother,” and the “hugging saint.” Following is the UC Press’s description of the book: "Globally known as Amma, meaning "Mother," Mata Amritanandamayi has developed a massive transnational humanitarian organization based in hugs. She is familiar to millions as the “hugging saint,” a moniker that derives from her elaborate darshan programs wherein nearly every day ten thousand people are embraced by the

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Research Focus Group Workshop: Graduate Student Research

November 9, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

The Asian/American Studies Collective is excited to host two events showcasing graduate student research this quarter. Graduate students will be presenting their research as part of the Collective-sponsored graduate seminar ASAM 200. These workshops will be held on November 9th and December 14th from 11am to 1pm PST. Sponsored by the IHC's Asian/American Studies Collective Research Focus Group

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Research Focus Group Workshop: Embodied Ownership: Sheppard Lee and Proprietary Whiteness in Jacksonian America
Merav Schocken

November 10, 2020 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

REGISTER NOW This workshop will discuss a PRECIRCULATED chapter from Merav Schocken’s dissertation, “Functional Fictions: Practices of Self-Deception in 19th-Century America.” (Please click on the “Download Reading” button above to access the precirculated chapter.) The chapter explores the narrative practices of self-deception that underlie the consolidation of proprietary whiteness in Jacksonian America. Schocken focuses on Robert Montgomery Bird’s Sheppard Lee (1836), claiming that the novel registers, and seeks to reconcile, anxieties among upper-class whites about the inclusion of propertyless white men in the electorate. Looking at the novel’s representation of whiteness as a neutral category as embodied by its propertyless white protagonist, Schocken argues that Black subjugation constituted a central yet crucially unacknowledged means by which the white subject, regardless of class, affirmed his belonging to the white man's republic. Merav Schocken is a PhD candidate in English at the

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Research Focus Group Talk: Dismembering Classicism: Contesting Colonial and Classical Legacies in the Southwest
Kendall Lovely

November 12, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

REGISTER NOW Classicization in U.S. heritage narratives often involves the imposition of classical elements, derived from Greek and Roman civilization, onto narratives of colonial conquest in Southwestern borderlands and frontier spaces. Ongoing controversies surrounding statues of the conquistador, Juan de Oñate, reflect the ways in which the classical legacy remains prominent in public spheres of historical narrative. In providing a visual narrative of conquest linked to classical imagery, the Spanish history of the settling of the Southwest becomes implicated in broader U.S. historical narratives that valorize conquest as a civilizing force in the settling of the American West. While much of this classical imagery first appeared in Spanish sources, this paper traces specifically how these classicized narratives of Spanish conquest became appropriated and implicated in Anglo-American/U.S. historical narratives, as well as counter-narratives of Indigenous resistance. Kendall Lovely, a member of

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Research Focus Group Talk: Assistive Technologies and Erotic Adaptation: Queer Disability in the Renaissance
Simone Chess

November 13, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Disability Studies RFG

REGISTER NOW Simone Chess will focus on early modern disability, queerness, and adaptive technologies. Chess is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program at Wayne State University in Detroit. She is the author of Male-to-Female Crossdressing in Early Modern English Literature: Gender, Performance, and Queer Relations (Routledge, 2016) and coeditor, with Colby Gordon and Will Fisher, of a special issue on “Early Modern Trans Studies” for the Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies. Cosponsored by the IHC’s Disability Studies Initiative Research Focus Group and UCSB’s Early Modern Center REGISTER NOW

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Research Focus Group Workshop: Cowboys in the Colosseum
Brad Bouley

November 13, 2020 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

REGISTER HERE Join us to workshop "Cowboys in the Colosseum: Papal Power, Cattle Rustling, and Meat Supply in Early Modern Italy," a chapter from Brad Bouley's current book project. Brad Bouley (Assistant Professor, Department of History) specializes in histories of religion and science in the early modern, especially Italian, context. He is author of Pious Postmortems: Anatomy, Sanctity, and the Catholic Church in Early Modern Europe (UPenn, 2017). His current project, The Barberini Butchers: Meat, Murder, and Warfare in Early Modern Italy, investigates papal food policies formed during the Counter Reformation in an effort to promote Rome as an early modern city. Sponsored by the IHC's Connectivity in the Premodern Mediterranean Research Focus Group REGISTER HERE Image: Claude Lorraine, Campo Vaccino, 1636

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Information Sessions: Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program

November 17, 2020 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Tuesday, November 17, 3:00-4:00 PM | Zoom | REGISTER NOW AND Wednesday, November 18, 12:00-1:00 PM | Zoom | REGISTER NOW Join the IHC online to learn more about the Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program.  Explore the course requirements, hear about paid internship and fellow-designed community project opportunities, and find out more about the capstone presentation.

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Living Democracy Talk: Making Abolition Geographies: Stories from California
Ruth Wilson Gilmore

November 19, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Making Abolition Geographies: Stories from California

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link This talk explores how visions of abolition guide and connect organizing across a range of social justice struggles. Gilmore will highlight examples relating to environmental justice, public sector labor unions, farm workers, undocumented households, criminalized youth, and community based approaches to prevent and resolve gender and interpersonal violence. The vivid California stories she will present reveal how abolition is a practical program for urgent change grounded in the needs, talents, and dreams of vulnerable people. Audience Q&A will follow. Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Co-founder of many grassroots organizations including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network, Gilmore

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December 2020

Research Focus Group Discussion with Radhika Govindrajan about Her Book Animal Intimacies
Radhika Govindrajan

December 3, 2020 @ 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

ATTEND DISCUSSION This seminar session will feature a discussion with Radhika Govindrajan about her book Animal Intimacies: Interspecies Relatedness in India’s Central Himalayas (2018), which is an ethnographic study of the interspecies relationships between human and nonhuman animals in the mountain villages of the Central Himalayan state of Uttarakhand in India. Following is the University of Chicago Press’s description of the book: "What does it mean to live and die in relation to other animals? Animal Intimacies posits this central question alongside the intimate—and intense—moments of care, kinship, violence, politics, indifference, and desire that occur between human and non-human animals. Built on extensive ethnographic fieldwork in the mountain villages of India’s Central Himalayas, Radhika Govindrajan’s book explores the number of ways that humans and animals interact to cultivate relationships as interconnected, related beings. Whether it is through the study of

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Research Focus Group Workshop: Graduate Student Research

December 14, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

The Asian/American Studies Collective is excited to host two events showcasing graduate student research this quarter. Graduate students will be presenting their research as part of the Collective-sponsored graduate seminar ASAM 200. These workshops will be held on November 9th and December 14th from 11am to 1pm PST. Sponsored by the IHC's Asian/American Studies Collective Research Focus Group

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Workshop: Demystifying the Book Publishing Process & Connecting with UC Colleagues

December 15, 2020 @ 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER UC Press editors will offer insight into the academic book publishing process. The presentation will include: choosing the right publisher; preparing a book proposal; how the peer review and Editorial Committee process works; revising your manuscript; and working with publishers to promote your book. The session is intended to be interactive and questions are welcome. Following the presentation, we will host breakout rooms with editors based on field interests. This is also an opportunity to connect with faculty and graduate students who share similar intellectual interests. When you sign up, please select a breakout room. If your area is not represented in the breakout session, please let us know your specialization. PRESENTERS: • Raina Polivka, Editor, UC Press • Kate Marshall, Editor, UC Press • Archna Patel, Associate Editor, UC Press • Beth Digeser, Professor, History,

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January 2021

Research Focus Group Talk: The Asian/American Studies Collective Winter Speakers Series
Simi Kang

January 12, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Zoom Meeting Link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/82289262845 The Asian/American Studies Collective is excited to announce our winter speakers series, which features an exciting lineup of scholars from across the UCSB campus. For each talk, an invited speaker will share their current research during the first hour and the second hour will be explicitly dedicated to creating space to allow graduate students to ask questions related to research and professionalization. Our first speaker is Dr. Simi Kang, a queer, mixed Sikh American community advocate, educator, artist, and scholar. Kang's work centers Southeast Asian American collaborative resistance to imagine environmentally and economically just futures in Louisiana. Kang is a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow in UCSB's Department of Asian American Studies. Abstract: Every year, multiple times a year, Southeast Louisiana’s coast-dependent communities must make the impossible decision to remain in an environmental sacrifice zone or leave home

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Research Focus Group Panel: Sex Work in the Time of Covid
Sinnamon Love, MF Akynos, Chiqui

January 21, 2021 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

REGISTER NOW This panel will bring together the insight and expertise of three sex worker activists working and organizing in North America and Europe; including Sinnamon Love, BIPOC Adult Industry Collective, MF Akynos, Black Sex Workers' Collective, and Chiqui, Berlin Strippers Collective. It will be the first in a multi-part webinar conversation in 2020-2021 focused on sex work and sexual politics in the time of COVIC in a global frame. REGISTER NOW Cosponsored by the IHC's New Sexualities Research Focus Group and the MultiCultural Center

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Living Democracy Talk: Land Grab U: Land-Grant Universities and Indigenous Peoples
Tristan Ahtone and Robert Lee

January 22, 2021 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Land Grab U: Land-Grant Universities and Indigenous Peoples

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Act, which distributed public domain lands to raise funds for fledgling colleges across the nation. The creation story told around this event is that land-grant universities were given the gift of free land. But the truth is much more complicated: The Morrill Act worked by turning land expropriated from tribal nations into seed money for higher education. In all, the act redistributed nearly 10.8 million acres from more than 250 tribal nations for the benefit of 52 colleges. Those lands, when grouped together, represent an area approximately the size of Denmark. Ahtone and Lee's presentation will both examine the land specifically used to found the University of California and also discuss the methods employed in this investigation of land expropriation, in

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POSTPONED – Research Focus Group Meeting: Art, Environment, and Sense-Making
Daniel Martini

January 25, 2021 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED At the last meeting of the Sustainability and the New Human RFG, Professor Suh discussed sustainability and behavior change. This talk will continue our conversation about the interdependence of humans and the environment by offering an ecological approach to how we understand the arts. At this meeting, PhD candidate Daniel Martini will share his dissertation research on how aesthetic appreciation (‘sense-making’) can emerge from both the rigidity of universal human cognitive structures and the massive influence of environmental variations. The presentation will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Colin Gardner. The meeting is open to all but we do ask you to register to attend so that we can spend our time in the meeting as productively as possible. Please register by January 21. After you’ve registered, you will receive a Zoom invitation

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Research Focus Group Talk: The Asian/American Studies Collective Winter Speakers Series
Diane Fujino

January 26, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Zoom Meeting Link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/84178208506 The Asian/American Studies Collective is proud to celebrate the publication of Dr. Diane Fujino's book, Nisei Radicals: The Feminist Poetics and Transformative Ministry of Mitsuye Yamada and Michael Yasutake. About the book While critiques of the model minority trope abound, this work has not dislodged the Nisei, or second-generation Japanese Americans, from the label of “Quiet Americans.” Working against the announced politics of Nisei assimilationism, this talk examines the feminist poetics of Mitsuye Yamada and the transformational “jubilee liberation” ministry of her brother, Rev. Michael Yasutake. Mitsuye Yamada’s sensitive writings are known for revealing tropes of silence in the lives of Japanese American women, often through critique of the complicated relationship with her own mother. Michael Yasutake moved from military resistance during World War II, to counseling draft objector during the Vietnam War, to explicit opposition

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Research Focus Group Talk: Cybercrime in Digital India: Jamtara’s Youth and OTT Production Cultures
Rahul Mukherjee

January 29, 2021 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

ATTEND DISCUSSION Continuing a trend set by Bollywood cinema since the mid-2000s, small towns and villages in India are being mined for their performative excess, comic potential, and cultures of violence by platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. Mukherjee traced this trend to Jamtara: Sabka Number Aayega (Jan 2020–), an over-the-top (OTT) crime drama from Netflix/Tipping Point that portrays real-life mobile phone phishing scams conducted by teenagers in the state of Jharkhand. The reliance on concept development based on localized research within an OTT production culture ensured that the innovative story and subject matter of Jamtara intrigued audiences. However, the later episodes, instead of focusing on the forensic and infrastructural intricacies of phishing, depicted gratuitous violence instigated by a local politician figure. The theme of cybercrime provided Jamtara a way to inflect earlier registers of crime with discourses around

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February 2021

Research Focus Group Discussion: Shifting Paradigms Around Neurodiversity

February 1, 2021 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Disability Studies RFG

Zoom Meeting Link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/82480745298?pwd=a3RkcUVKaWJoN0dEUkZPQjFQWVN1dz09 This discussion will focus on thinking about new paradigms in autism and neurodiversity. We will read the article titled "Throw Away the Master's Tools: Liberating Ourselves From the Pathology Paradigm," by Nick Walker (from Loud Hands: Autistic People, Speaking ) and the introduction to Autistic Disturbances (2018) by Julia Miele Rodas. If time permits, the discussion will also include Mad at School: Rhetorics of Disability and Academic Life (2011) by Margaret Price, which tackles mental illness/health, college students/faculty, psychology, mentally disabled persons, personal narratives, communication, and stereotypes. Sponsored by the IHC’s Disability Studies Initiative Research Focus Group Zoom Meeting Link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/82480745298?pwd=a3RkcUVKaWJoN0dEUkZPQjFQWVN1dz09

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Talk: An Expansive Rebellion: Feminism and Social Revolt in Chile
Pierina Ferretti and Mia Dragnic

February 1, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Zoom Meeting Link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/89256077958?pwd=Mlp2MWFNVENGRTNmZXFIb2k0WE5rZz09 Zoom Room Password: chile FEMINISMS FROM BELOW, AND TOWARDS THE SOUTH This speaker series welcomes feminist militants from Latin America to share their perspectives and experiences on building popular power towards a mass feminist movement. Over the past decade, Latin American feminists have identified manifestations of gender-based oppression under capitalism in everyday women’s conditions in order to successfully mobilize them as part of a political movement. Feminists produce analyses and subsequent strategies around reproductive rights, resource extractivism, housing, debt, and more. This mass feminism has grown to be arguably the most insurgent political force across the continent. FIRST TALK: An Expansive Rebellion: Feminism and Social Revolt in Chile In October 2019, Chile experienced its largest social revolt since the return to democracy in 1990. The mobilization, which began as a spontaneous reaction to protest against a

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Talk: Gendered Violence and Financialization of Social Reproduction: A Feminist Perspective On Debt
Lucia Cavallero

February 8, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

REGISTER NOW FEMINISMS FROM BELOW, AND TOWARDS THE SOUTH This speaker series welcomes feminist militants from Latin America to share their perspectives and experiences on building popular power towards a mass feminist movement. Over the past decade, Latin American feminists have identified manifestations of gender-based oppression under capitalism in everyday women’s conditions in order to successfully mobilize them as part of a political movement. Feminists produce analyses and subsequent strategies around reproductive rights, resource extractivism, housing, debt, and more. This mass feminism has grown to be arguably the most insurgent political force across the continent. SECOND TALK: Gendered Violence and Financialization of Social Reproduction: A Feminist Perspective On Debt The presentation will focus on the relationship and intersection between sexist violence and economic violence, specifically the financialization of life and the increase in sexist violence. It will highlight the Latin

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Research Focus Group Talk: Social Media and the Shape of “Man”
Alexander Cho

February 9, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Zoom Meeting Link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/85893482888 Inspired by Cho's ethnographic work with queer of color users of the platform Tumblr and using the Tumblr presence of Filipinx transfeminine visual and performance artist Mark Aguhar as a recurring touchstone, this work-in-progress talk’s provocation is that the assumptive ways in which a social media platform “should” be designed—singular identity, linear text exchanges, direct messaging, traversable connections, and more—in fact instantiate a model of “Man” that can be traced back to the epistemological violences of European colonialism. Relying on Sylvia Wynter’s invocation of the idea of homo oeconomicus as well as Lisa Lowe’s historical analysis of the colonial-era origins of the modern liberal subject, this talk excavates the assumptions of the specific manner in which “Man” is instantiated online and offers design examples that resist this logic, inviting us to imagine digital sociality from a

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Living Democracy Talk: Strongmen: From Mussolini to Trump
Ruth Ben-Ghiat

February 11, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Strongmen: From Mussolini to Trump

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link What do strongman leaders across a century have in common? Why do people continue to follow them, despite the destruction they cause? Drawing on her new book, Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present, Ruth Ben-Ghiat discusses the playbook of corruption, virility, propaganda, and violence they utilize, how people have resisted authoritarians over a century, and what we can do to strengthen democracy in America and around the world. Audience Q&A will follow. Ruth Ben-Ghiat is Professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University. She writes frequently for CNN and other news and analysis sites on fascism, authoritarian leaders, propaganda, and threats to democracy around the world and how to counter them. Sponsored by the IHC’s Living Democracy series, the IHC’s Harry Girvetz Memorial Endowment, and the UCSB Italian Studies Program

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Humanities Decanted: The Musical Heritage of Al-Andalus
Dwight Reynolds

February 18, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm

Click here for a 20% publisher's discount on The Musical Heritage of Al-Andalus   Join us online for a dialogue between Dwight Reynolds (Religious Studies) and Debra Blumenthal (History) about Reynolds’ new book, The Musical Heritage of Al-Andalus. Audience Q&A will follow. The Musical Heritage of Al-Andalus is a critical account of the history of Andalusian music in Iberia from the Islamic conquest of 711 to the final expulsion of the Moriscos (Spanish Muslims converted to Christianity) in the early 17th century. This volume presents the documentation that has come down to us, accompanied by critical and detailed analyses of the sources written in Arabic, Old Catalan, Castilian, Hebrew, and Latin. It is also informed by research the author has conducted on modern Andalusian musical traditions in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon, and Syria. While the cultural achievements of medieval

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AIIC 2021 8th Annual Symposium: Native Feminisms
Mishuana Goeman and Laura Harjo

February 19, 2021 @ 10:00 am - February 21, 2021 @ 3:00 pm

REGISTER NOW The Eighth Annual AIIC Symposium, “Native Feminisms: Centering American Indian and Indigenous Land and People,” seeks to focus Native feminisms by privileging the knowledge of Native women, girls, trans, non-binary, and two spirit people. As Mishuana Goeman shows, drawing attention to embodied experience, positionality, and spatiality foregrounds relationships between bodies, minds, spirits, and lands as methods of knowledge creation. Relevant topics to broader discussions of Native feminisms include: embodiment, futurity, spatiality, memory, trauma, ecological relationality, community knowledge, emergence, collective power, ceremony, decolonization, education, reclamation, and felt theory. The AIIC Symposium seeks to explore how Native feminist cartographies help us remap and reimagine the relationship between people, kin, communities, temporality, and the land. We hope to raise questions about public space and protest, environment and ecological knowledge, storytelling, violence, education, Indigeneity, decolonial thinking, gender, and multiraciality. We embrace non-linear,

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Research Focus Group Talk: Elemental City: Ecology, Media and Narratives of Crisis in Postcolonial Calcutta
Somak Mukherjee

February 22, 2021 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

This talk explores how the cultural politics of elemental media influence crisis narratives produced in relation to urban change. Taking Calcutta as a case study, Doctoral Candidate Somak Mukherjee argues that the crisis of postcolonial cities has a distinct ecological imaginary, borne of tension between mediated pairings of elements and more typical civic imaginaries such as civility, citizenship, community, development, or progress. Four examples of elements—earth, air, water, and fire—are used as representative figures to explore how their cultural registers comment on questions of method, archives, and media in thinking about urban space. The presentation will be followed by a discussion moderated by Surojit Kayal. The meeting is open to all but we do ask you to register to attend so that we can spend our time in the meeting as productively as possible. Please register by February 18. After you’ve registered,

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Living Democracy Talk: Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration
Reuben Jonathan Miller

February 25, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Reuben Miller Critical Mass Talk

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link While more people are incarcerated in the United States than in any other nation in the history of the western world, the prison is but one (comparatively) small part of a vast carceral landscape. The 600,000 people released each year join nearly 5 million people already on probation or parole, 12 million who are processed through a county jail, 19 million U.S. adults estimated to have a felony conviction, and the staggering 79 million Americans with a criminal record. But the size of the U.S. carceral state is second in consequence to its reach. Incarcerated people are greeted by more than 48,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions upon release that limit their participation in the labor and housing markets, in the culture and civic life of the city, and

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Talk: We Are Charrúa Women: From Negation to Re-Existence In Our Body-Territory
Mónica Michelena

February 26, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

REGISTER NOW Charrúa women have gone through dispossession, exclusion, and negation that left marks on their collective memory and body-territory. This genocidal process did not end in 19th-century Uruguay, but continues today and manifests itself every time that institutions or civil society denies their existence as an indigenous people. For fifteen years, together with Charrúa sisters from Argentina, Charrúa women from Uruguay have been working to demolish hegemonic narratives of the market and state. As subjects of legal right, they are reconfiguring their existence and re-existence in their great ancestral-territory-body. This collective search has led Mónica Michelena to academic spaces. In 2011, Michelena began an investigation with rural Charrúa women in Uruguay’s interior to question the nation-state’s devices of invisibility and to expose counter-memories as part of an attempt to disarm the social and symbolic representation of their extinction. Through

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March 2021

Research Focus Group Roundtable: Disability Justice Conversation

March 2, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Disability Studies RFG

REGISTER HERE Join Gary White, UCSB's Disabled Students Program, Eric Kruger, UCSB's Disabled Students Program, Afiya Browne, UCSB's Multicultural Center, Sam del Castillo, Graduate Division and graduate student, and Shanna Killeen, Disability Studies Initiative RFG, for a conversation about accessibility and intersectional justice. This conversation will discuss information, tools, and resources for creating intentional and accessible spaces and community engagement. This conversation also aims to help us think through what this moment of remote work means for our communities. How do graduate students navigate access in an already inaccessible world? Our hope is to have an impactful conversation about resources and accessibility as a foundation and not an add on, and to help us imagine how creating accessible spaces benefits us all. Sponsored by the IHC's Disability Studies Initiative Research Focus Group, Muticultural Center, Graduate Center for Literary Research, Graduate

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Humanities Decanted: Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture
W. Patrick McCray

March 4, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a dialogue between Patrick McCray (History) and Alan Liu (English) about McCray’s new book, Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture. Audience Q&A will follow. Despite C. P. Snow’s warning, in 1959, of an unbridgeable chasm between the humanities and the sciences, engineers and scientists of that era enthusiastically collaborated with artists to create visually and sonically interesting multimedia works. This new artwork emerged from corporate laboratories, artists’ studios, publishing houses, art galleries, and university campuses and it involved some of the biggest stars of the art world. Less famous and often overlooked were the engineers and scientists who contributed time, technical expertise, and aesthetic input to these projects. These figures included the rocket engineer-turned-artist Frank J. Malina,

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Research Focus Group Talk: Kings and Cripples in the Arthurian World
Christopher Baswell

March 5, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Zoom meeting link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/87492220092?pwd=RExPbnl0N3d0ZVR2ZGpEdkJ1cHdPQT09 While the lived reality of disability in the Middle Ages was surely a wretched one, at the same time we encounter persistent associations between disabled and royal or aristocratic bodies in medieval culture, its imagery and narratives. Nowhere is this truer than in the Arthurian world, at whose core there lies a powerful but immobile figure, the Rich Fisher King. This talk looks at such linkage through Arthurian texts and illustrated manuscripts, especially the vast Lancelot Prose Cycle. Christopher Baswell is the Acting Chair of the Department of English and the Ann Whitney Olin Professor of English at Barnard College. He is also Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Cosponsored by the IHC's Disability Studies Initiative Research Focus Group and the UCSB English Department Early Modern Center Zoom meeting link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/87492220092?pwd=RExPbnl0N3d0ZVR2ZGpEdkJ1cHdPQT09

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Research Focus Group Talk: Cannabis and South Asia
Utathya Chattopadhyaya

March 9, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Zoom meeting link: https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/81976204749?pwd=ekZ2UUtFd0U0Znh6bFpIcXFXWUs5QT09 Historical scholarship now conceives empire as a webbed uneven field of power relations and a multispecies enterprise. In other words, the anxious and breathless struggle of European imperialism to sustain itself subjected human, plant, animal, and insect bodies to its ambition to govern through logics of colonial difference. This paper argues that the cannabis plant in South Asia, in the nineteenth century, while being a subject of British revenue systems transformed into a race-d and gendered mode of explaining anticolonial insurgency by South Asian rebels. The intoxicating substance of the plant, in the discursive logic of empire, was seen to vitiate Asian bodies against European power. Cannabis also animated other imperial operations like the delegitimization of Indian sovereignty. Using the expansive reach of imperial periodical culture in the nineteenth century, this paper highlights the Asian and

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Talk: A Wave of Difference: Language Expression in the Argentine Feminist Imaginary
Nicolas Cuello

March 11, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

REGISTER NOW In the context of a disproportionate increase in sexual violence against cis, trans, and transvestite women since 2015, Argentine feminisms have prefigured the untimely irruption of public space in both process and form. The movements’ interventions not only impact the social conditions and the epistemic tools for popular intelligibility of language expression ​​of gender violence, through an innovative use of communication technologies and social networks, but also articulate, from the multidimensionality in which inequality operates by gender and more broadly, a transversal resistance to the oppressive characteristics that would accompany the neoliberal turn produced by public policy under President Mauricio Macri's corporate governance mandate (2015-2019). This new state of public attention and mass representation allowed a reorganization of desires to spread and multiply across territories, professional careers, bodies, and communities throughout the country, which would forever transform the

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Research Focus Group Talk: The Blood Files: Epidemic, Medium, Milieu
Bishnupriya Ghosh

March 12, 2021 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

ATTEND DISCUSSION Epidemics make us keenly aware of our multispecies distributions: of changes to our microbial makeup, of the mediums (body fluids to the elements) that enable transmission. While our body makes us aware of fevers and aches, we need technical mediation beyond the everyday thermometer to track and understand changing microbial-human relations. Epidemic media—a range of technologies, microscopes to PCR machines—are the subject of Bishnupriya Ghosh’s book, The Virus Touch: Theorizing Epidemic Media. Drawing on two research sites thousands of miles apart yet embedded in the global biomedical complex—a retrovirus laboratory at the University of Washington, Seattle, and a modest clinical point of care at the Humsafar offices in Mumbai—Ghosh considers how the ordinary technology of the “blood file” (samples, data, and pictures) makes the medium intelligible as a milieu. Bishnupriya Ghosh is Professor of Global Studies and English

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Research Focus Group Discussion: Designing Disability
Elizabeth Guffey

March 15, 2021 @ 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Disability Studies RFG

ATTEND DISCUSSION We will be discussing Professor Elizabeth Guffey's introduction and chapter 1 to her latest book, Designing Disability (Bloomsbury, 2018). A Professor of Art & Design History, and Director of the MA in Modern and Contemporary Art, Criticism and Theory at State University of New York at Purchase, Professor Guffey co-edited Making Disability Modern (Bloomsbury, 2020) and is the founding editor of the peer-reviewed journal Design and Culture (Routledge). Cosponsored by the IHC’s Disability Studies Initiative Research Focus Group, the Department of English, and the Department of Comparative Literature ATTEND DISCUSSION

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Medieval Studies Annual Colloquium: Global/Premodern/Race

March 21, 2021 @ 9:15 am - 3:00 pm

Register by emailing global.premodern.race@gmail.com by March 19, 2021 This symposium brings together scholars working in Iberian, Middle Eastern, and Medieval Studies to engage in a critical discussion concerning race—reevaluating both its utility as a category of analysis in the premodern world and how it has structured medieval and early modern studies as academic fields. Participants include: PAMELA PATTON (Art History, Princeton University) M. LINDSAY KAPLAN (English, Georgetown University) HANNAH BARKER (History, Arizona State University) MOHAMAD BALLAN (History, SUNY Stonybrook) AMBEREEN DADABHOY (Literature, Harvey Mudd College) JOSH COHEN (Committee on the Study of Religion, Harvard University) ABDULHAMIT ARVAS (English, University of Pennsylvania) TERENCE KEEL (African American Studies & Institute for Society and Genetics, UCLA) KATHY LAVEZZO (English, University of Iowa) Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center; Medieval Studies; Early Modern Center, English Department; Center for Middle Eastern Studies; College of Letters

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April 2021

Research Focus Group Talk: Lingvo Internacia: The Esperanto Movement in China and Japan, 1905-1932
Joshua Fogel

April 8, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

REGISTER NOW In this RFG talk, Joshua Fogel will present on "Lingvo Internacia: The Esperanto Movement in China and Japan, 1905-1932." Joshua Fogel is Professor of History and Canada Research Chair at York University, Toronto. Sponsored by the IHC’s Transregional East Asia Research Focus Group REGISTER NOW

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