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November 2019

Talk: Human Simulation: Artificial Intelligence, Ethics, and the Future of the Humanities
F. LeRon Shults

November 18, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

The capacities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) are growing rapidly and new technologies are impacting society in a variety of ways, all of which raise significant ethical issues. LeRon Shults (University of Adger, Norway) argues that the Humanities are needed to help guide the ethical conversations around AI by becoming more engaged in “Human Simulation,” a new interdisciplinary approach to simulating human futures (as well as studying the past) that requires the expertise of historians, philosophers, ethicists, and other students of human nature. F. LeRon Shults, Ph.D. is a Professor at the Institute for Global Development and Social Planning at the University of Agder, Norway, and Scientific Director, Center for Modeling Social Systems. Shults, whose graduate training was in the study of religion, has been collaborating with computer modelers to demonstrate the value of computer modeling and simulation for refining and…

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ready or Not

November 18, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ready or Not at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Humanities Decanted: Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands
Miroslava Chávez-García

November 20, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Humanities Decanted Chavez-Garcia

Join us for a dialogue between Miroslava Chávez-García (History) and John S.W. Park (Asian American Studies) about Chávez-García’s new book, Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. Refreshments will be served. Migrant Longing draws upon Miroslava Chávez-García’s personal collection of 300 letters exchanged by family members across the U.S.-Mexico border, illuminating what migrants experienced in their everyday lives both “here” and “there” (aqui y alla). Chávez-García uses these private, firsthand accounts to demonstrate not only how migrants struggled to maintain their sense of humanity in el norte but also how those remaining at home made sense of their changing identities in response to the loss of loved ones. Miroslava Chávez-García is Professor in the Department of History at UC Santa Barbara and holds affiliate status in the Departments of Chicana and Chicano Studies and Feminist Studies. She is the…

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Research Focus Group Talk: For He Gladdens the Earth: Consent and Conjugality in the Astral State
Marko Geslani

November 20, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
3041 HSSB, HSSB, UCSB

Traditional discussions of gender in Hindu traditions often begin with a critique of patriarchy in orthodox Brahmanical Dharmaśāstras, followed by a turn to potential feminist resources—for example, in goddess worship, Śākta traditions, and Tantra. One effect of this line of thinking has been a relative absence within Hindu studies of reflections on gender in relation to state power, a thematic hallmark of feminist postcolonial histories of South Asia. Geslani’s talk reframes the question of gender in premodern Hindu traditions by historicizing orthodox gender theories in relation to other contemporaneous interlocutors. He focuses on royal sexual politics as depicted in the astral sciences, Jyotiḥśāstras, which he argues are crucial texts for uncovering the ideology of the medieval state. When placed in relation to ritual and omenology, an astral theory of conjugality reveals the uniquely gendered power of royal bodies to naturalize…

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Critical Mass Talk: Ady Barkan: Love and Death, Hope and Resistance
Ady Barkan

November 21, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Sitting in that hotel armchair, I realized that my deadly disease was giving me newfound power at the very moment it was depriving me of so much strength. My voice was growing softer, but I was being heard by more people than ever before. My legs were disintegrating, but more and more people were following in my footsteps. Precisely because my days were numbered, people drew inspiration from my decision to spend them in resistance. Precisely because I faced such obstacles, my comrades were moved by my message that struggle is never futile. In this talk, the paralyzed political activist Ady Barkan will explore the existential questions that he has faced in the wake of his terminal diagnosis with ALS, and that the American people have faced under the Trump administration: What kind of life will our children have, and…

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Talk: Economic Policy and the Civil Rights Struggle for Guaranteed Jobs
David Stein

November 22, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

David Stein, African American Studies, UCLA A UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Stein is the author of the forthcoming book, Fearing Inflation, Inflating Fears: The Civil Rights Struggle for Full Employment and the Rise of the Carceral State, 1929-1986. This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood

November 22, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical

November 22, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical Friday, November 22nd at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood

November 25, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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December 2019

Talk: Hamlet Sings!: The Operatic Life of Shakespeare’s Dane from the Baroque Era to the 21st Century
William Germano

December 5, 2019 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

William Germano, Professor of English at Cooper Union, is the author of Getting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books; From Dissertation to Book; Eye Chart, among others. Prof. Germano will present a part of his current project tentatively titled, Shakespeare at the Opera: A History of Impossible Projects. *Prof. Germano will also hold a publication workshop on revising academic writing, which is mostly tailored for junior faculty who work on their first book projects. If interested, please RSVP with Abdulhamit Arvas . Please note there is very limited seating for this workshop and the priority will be given to junior faculty. It is on December 5th, Thursday, 1.30-3 pm at the TD seminar room. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, Department of Theater and Dance, Early Modern Center, the Dean of Humanities and Fine…

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Humanities Decanted: Borges, Buddhism and World Literature: A Morphology of Renunciation Tales
Dominique Jullien

December 5, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Dominique Jullien (French and Comparative Literature) and Sowon Park (English) about Jullien’s new book, Borges, Buddhism and World Literature: A Morphology of Renunciation Tales. Refreshments will be served. Jullien’s latest book follows the renunciation story in Borges and beyond, arguing for its centrality as a Borgesian compositional trope and as a Borgesian prism for reading a global constellation of texts. The renunciation story at the heart of Buddhism, that of a king who leaves his palace to become an ascetic, fascinated Borges because of its cross-cultural adaptability and metamorphic nature, and because it resonated so powerfully across philosophy, politics and aesthetics. From the story and its many variants, Borges’s essays formulated a 'morphological' conception of literature (borrowing the idea from Goethe), whereby a potentially infinite number of stories were generated by transformation of a…

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: IT Chapter Two

December 6, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of IT Chapter Two at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show

December 6, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show Friday, December 6th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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January 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Nations in Crisis, People in Crisis: Connecting Upheaval
Jared Diamond

January 15, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Nations that successfully navigate crises do so by making selective changes to their identities and actions. When individuals experience crises—mid-life, financial, health, relationship—they may also adopt selective changes to overcome the situation. But some individuals, like some nations, are better at navigating upheaval than others. By drawing on the factors that counselors and psychotherapists have identified that affect the likelihood of overcoming personal crisis, Diamond will examine the extent to which crisis response on the individual scale helps us to understand the outcomes of recent and impending national and world crises. Jared Diamond is professor of Geography at UCLA and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Collapse, and other books. Copies of Diamond's books will be available for purchase and signing. Sponsored by the IHC’s Critical Mass series Image: Kinuko Y. Craft

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March 2020

Humanities Decanted: Transgenerational Remembrance: Performance and the Asia-Pacific War in Contemporary Japan
Jessica Nakamura

March 5, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Jessica Nakamura

Join us for a dialogue between Jessica Nakamura (Theater and Dance) and Catherine Nesci (Comparative Literature) about Nakamura’s new book, Transgenerational Remembrance: Performance and the Asia-Pacific War in Contemporary Japan. Refreshments will be served. In Transgenerational Remembrance, Jessica Nakamura investigates the role of artistic production in the commemoration and memorialization of the Asia-Pacific War (1931–1945) in Japan since 1989. During this time, survivors of Japanese aggression and imperialism, previously silent about their experiences, have sparked contentious public debates about the form and content of war memories. Working from theoretical frameworks of haunting and ethics, Nakamura develops an analytical lens based on the Noh theater ghost. Noh emphasizes the agency of the ghost and the dialogue between the dead and the living. Integrating her Noh-inflected analysis into ethical and transnational feminist queries, Nakamura shows that performances move remembrance beyond current evidentiary and…

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April 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Notes on the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration
Reuben Jonathan Miller

April 16, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

While more people are incarcerated in the United States than in any other nation in the history of the western world, the prison is but one (comparatively) small part of a vast carceral landscape. The 600,000 people released each year join nearly 5 million people already on probation or parole, 12 million who are processed through a county jail, 19 million U.S. adults estimated to have a felony conviction, and the staggering 79 million Americans with a criminal record. But the size of the U.S. carceral state is second in consequence to its reach. Incarcerated people are greeted by more than 48,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions upon release that limit their participation in the labor and housing markets, in the culture and civic life of the city, and even within their families. They are subject to rules other people…

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The 2020 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence: Jesmyn Ward

April 29, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

MacArthur Genius and two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward has been called “the new Toni Morrison” (American Booksellers Association). In 2017, she became the first woman and first person of color to win the National Book Award twice—joining the ranks of William Faulkner, Saul Bellow, John Cheever, Philip Roth, and John Updike. Her writing, which encompasses fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, is “raw, beautiful, and dangerous” (The New York Times Book Review). Ward’s novels, primarily set on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast, are deeply informed by the trauma of Hurricane Katrina. Salvage the Bones, winner of the 2011 National Book Award, is a troubling but ultimately empowering tale of familial bonds set amid the chaos of the hurricane. Ward’s memoir, Men We Reaped, deals with the loss of five young men in her life—to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that follows people…

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May 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited
Lizabeth Cohen

May 7, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities--in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the federal government responsible for funding more affordable housing and other urban investments, rather than turn to the private sector. Cohen will revisit this history by following the long career of Edward J. Logue, who worked to revitalize New Haven in the 1950s, became the architect of the “New Boston” in the 1960s, and later led innovative organizations in New York at the state level and in the South Bronx. She will analyze the evolution in Logue’s thinking and actions, when and how…

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