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October 2017

TALK: Defeating the Forces Behind Trump

October 6, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Law’s Labor and Worklife Program, Jane McAlevey is the author of No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age (2016); and Raising Expectations and Raising Hell: My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement (2012). Sponsored by The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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TALK: Nation’s Out of Nurseries, Empires into Bottles: The Colonial Politics of Welfare Orange Juice

October 13, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Nadja Durbach (History, University of Utah) is the author of Spectacle of Deformity: Freak Shows and Modern British Culture (2009); and Bodily Matters: The Anti-Vaccination Movement in England, 1853-1907 (2004).

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CONFERENCE: Interconnected Medieval Worlds

October 13, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - October 14, 2017 @ 4:30 pm

The conference gathers American and international medieval scholars to present papers on the global Middle Ages, with attention to the regions of East Asia, Africa, and the Americas. It includes a panel on pedagogy, oriented towards teaching a Middle Ages that is not only Eurocentric but which expansively includes networks across several continents and civilizations. Further papers explore specific instances of such connectivity and interaction, with opportunities for discussion between presenters and participants throughout the weekend. The conference is funded by the Middle Ages in the Wider World Multi-Campus Research Program and organized by the Medieval Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara

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TALK: Cold War Crises: Foreign Medical Graduates Enter the U.S. Workforce

October 20, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A Postdoctoral Fellow in Penn’s Program on Race, Science, and Society, Eram Alam is completing a book, The Care of Foreigners, that explores the enduring consequences of the Cold War migration of thousands of Asian physicians to the United States. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program

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November 2017

TALK: How Did We Get Into This Mess?: Reclaiming Our Economy and Our Democracy

November 2, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Campbell Hall, Building 538, University of California, Santa Barbara, Mesa Rd,

Robert Reich (Chancellor's Professor and Carmel P. Friesen Chair in Public Policy, UC Berkeley) was Secretary of Labor in the Administration of Bill Clinton. He is the author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few (2016) and Aftershock: The Next Economy and America's Future (2013). Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; UCSB Arts and Lectures; and the Blum Center for Global Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development.

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TALK: The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the American Family

November 6, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Prior to World War II, international adoption was virtually unknown, but in the twenty-first century, it has become a common practice, touching almost every American. How did the adoption of foreign children by U.S. families become an essential part of American culture in such a short period of time? Rachel Rains Winslow investigates this question, following the trail from Europe to South Korea and then to Vietnam. The Best Possible Immigrants shows how a combination of domestic trends, foreign policies, and international instabilities created an environment in which adoption flourished. Winslow’s talk will bring this historical conversation up to the present. Rachel Rains Winslow is Assistant Professor of History at Westmont College, Director of Westmont’s Center for Social Entrepreneurship, and Co-Director of Westmont’s Initiative for Public Dialogue. She is the author of The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the…

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AWARD: Luis Leal Award for Distinction in Chicano/Latino Literature

November 7, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Norma Cantu (Trinity University) will receive this year's Luis Leal Award.  She is best known for her-coming of age memoir Canicula. Sponsored by the Chicano/Latino Research Group.

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January 2018

Talk: Financialization on the Factory Farm
Jan Dutkiewicz

January 26, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Jan Dutkiewicz (Politics, New School for Social Research), who is writing a dissertation at the New School on the political economy of hog farming in the contemporary United States, is currently a fellow at UCSB’s International Center for the Humanities and Social Change. This event is part of "Food, Finance, and American Politics," a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: The Betrayers
David Bezmozgis

January 28, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd
Free

David Bezmozgis is an award-winning writer and filmmaker. He is the author of several books, including Natasha and Other Stories (2004), The Free World (2011), and The Betrayers (2014). His writing has been published in The New Yorker, Harpers, Zoetrope All-Story, and The Walrus, among other publications. Bezmozgis is currently the head of the Humber School for Writers in Toronto. Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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February 2018

Talk: Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America
Nancy MacLean

February 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

In addition to Democracy in Chains (2016), Nancy MacLean (History, Duke) is the author of the award-winning books Freedom is Not Enough: the Opening of the American Workplace (2008) and Behind the Mask of Chivalry: the Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (1995). She is a past president of the Labor and Working-Class History Association. This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Talk: Plantation Labor Outsourced: Rethinking New England Outwork and the National Economy of Slavery in Antebellum America
Seth Rockman

February 16, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Seth Rockman (History, Brown) is the author of Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore (2008) and co-editor, with Sven Beckert, of Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development (2016). This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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March 2018

Talk: Burgers in the Age of Black Capitalism: Fast Food and the Remaking of Civil Rights after 1968
Marcia Chatelain

March 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Marcia Chatelain (History, Georgetown) is the author of South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration (2015) and co-editor, with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson, of Staging a Dream: Untold Stories and Transatlantic Legacies of the March on Washington (2015). This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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April 2018

Talk: Economic Justice is a Women’s Issue: The Chicana Welfare Rights Organization’s Challenge to Welfare Reform in the 1970s
Rosie Bermudez

April 20, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Bermudez is completing a dissertation, “Doing Dignity Work: Alicia Escalante and the East Los Angeles Welfare Rights Organization, 1967-1974.” She is a Woodrow Wilson Women’s Studies Fellow at UCSB. This event is a part of Economic Justice in a World of Corporate Hegemony, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Talk: Envisioning the Arab Future: Modernization in U.S.-Arab Relations, 1945-1967
Nate Citino

April 27, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Citino will discuss his most recent book, Envisioning the Arab Future: Modernization in U.S.-Arab Relations, 1945-1967 (2017). He is also the author of From Arab Nationalism to OPEC: Eisenhower, King Sa‘ud, and the Making of US - Saudi Relations (2002). Co-Sponsored with the Blum Center for Global Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development. This event is a part of Economic Justice in a World of Corporate Hegemony, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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May 2018

Talk: Sanctuary and Literature: Words on the Move
Marina Warner

May 1, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In the present refugee crisis, millions of people are being driven from their homes by war, religious conflict, racial ostracism, famine, and poverty. Can literature help? Stripped of material possessions, refugees, migrants, and ‘arrivants’ still own their minds, which are filled with memories, stories, and knowledge. Can the cultural baggage of the imagination, the stories that displaced people carry in their heads, provide ways of establishing connection with their new circumstances? Can stories, inspired by the cultures they belong to, overcome barriers of language and custom, help them relate to the new place of arrival and develop a place of refuge where they belong? Marina Warner will explore how the role of the imagination, expressed in literary forms, can provide threads which may be woven into the fabric of belonging. She will look at travelling texts, such as the animal…

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Talk: Florence Kelley and the Improbable Origins of Minimum Wage Legislation in the United States, 1887-1899
Kathryn Sklar

May 11, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A pioneering women’s history scholar, Sklar’s books include the prize-winning Florence Kelley and the Nation's Work: the Rise of Women's Political Culture, 1830-1900 (1995), Women's Rights Emerges within the Antislavery Movement (2000), and Catherine Beecher: A Study in American Domesticity (1973). This event is a part of Economic Justice in a World of Corporate Hegemony, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Talk: The Republic of Samsung: Labor, Governance, and the Crisis of Korean Democracy
Jin Hee Kim

May 25, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Currently a visiting fellow at the Center for the Study of the Work, Labor, and Democracy, Kim is the author of Labor Law and Labor Policy in New York State, 1920s-1930s (2006) and translator into Korean of John Dewey’s Liberalism and Social Action (2011). The editor and author of numerous books and articles on U.S. and Korean labor, Kim serves on the steering committee of the Seoul Labor Center. This event is a part of Economic Justice in a World of Corporate Hegemony, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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June 2018

Talk: General Electric versus the Market: the Road from Industrial to Financial Capitalism
Serge Ferrari

June 8, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Ferrari is completing his dissertation on GE, tracing how the corporation remade itself into a large-scale financial enterprise at the end of the twentieth century. This event is a part of Economic Justice in a World of Corporate Hegemony, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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October 2018

Talk: The Great Recession and Precarious Entrepreneurship among Latinos in the United States
Zulema Valdez

October 12, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Zulema Valdez, Sociology, UC Merced Valdez's research examines how social group formations—based on race, class, gender, and nativity—affect individual social and economic life chances. She is the author of The New Entrepreneurs: How Race, Class, and Gender Shape American Enterprise (2011) and Entrepreneurs and the Search for the American Dream (2015). This event is a part of Organizing U.S. Capitalism: From the Federal Reserve to the Unions, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Talk: Instability and Inequality: American Capitalism after the Volcker Shock of 1980
Jonathan Levy

October 19, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Jonathan Levy, History, University of Chicago Levy is an historian of U.S. capitalism, with interests in the relationships between the law, culture, political economy, and the history of ideas. He is the author of Freaks of Fortune: The Emerging World of Capitalism and Risk in America (2012) and the forthcoming Ages of American Capitalism. This event is a part of Organizing U.S. Capitalism: From the Federal Reserve to the Unions, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: Does Trump Have a Middle East Policy?
Dennis Ross

October 21, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Dennis Ross, Washington Institute for Near East Policy Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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Award: Luis Leal Award For Distinction in Chicano/Latino Literature
Tim Hernández

October 24, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Tim Hernández will receive this year's Luis Leal Award for Distinction in Chicano/Latino Literature.  His debut novel, Breathing, In Dust received the 2010 Premio Aztlan Prize in Fiction. His collection of poetry, Natural Takeover of Small Things was released in 2013 and received the 2014 Colorado Book Award, and his novel, Mañana Means Heaven, which is based on the life of Bea Franco, also released in 2013, went on the receive the 2014 International Latino Book Award in historical fiction.  His latest book, All They Will Call You, was released in 2017. A genre bending work labeled a Documentary Novel, it is based on the song by Woody Guthrie, “Plane Wreck at Los Gatos (Deportee).” Sponsored by the Chicano/Latino Research Group.

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Symposium: Rediscovering U.S. Newsfilm

October 25, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - October 27, 2018 @ 12:30 pm

In the twentieth century, U.S. filmmakers generated tens of thousands of hours of newsfilm that was screened in movie theaters or viewed on television sets across the country. This vast output of news coverage, covering the period from the 1910s to the 1970s, has not been matched by a scholarly effort to understand it. To address this persistent oversight, this symposium will, for the first time in the United States, bring together many of the nation’s leading newsfilm scholars and archivists to present new and foundational work that is featured in the new book Rediscovering U.S. Newsfilm: Cinema, Television and the Archive (AFI/Routledge, 2018), edited by Mark Cooper, Sara Levavy, Ross Melnick, and Mark Williams. This symposium, organized by Ross Melnick and Charles Wolfe, is free and open to the public and begins on Thursday, October 25th at 4:30pm and…

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November 2018

Talk: The Pyramid Problem: Regulating Direct Sales at the Edges of Labor and Consumption, 1972-1982
Jessica Burch

November 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Jessica Burch, School of Business, University of Utah Burch, a scholar of management, was a Newcomen fellow at Harvard University in 2015-16. She discusses a chapter from her forthcoming book, Door-to-Door Capitalism: Direct Selling in America from the New Deal to the Internet Age. This event is a part of Organizing U.S. Capitalism: From the Federal Reserve to the Unions, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Screening: 1968: The Year That Shaped a Generation
Salim Yaqub

November 7, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

1968 was a pivotal year in U.S. and global history. In the United States, students protested the Vietnam War. In France, they protested university conditions and sparked worker strikes across the country. In Mexico City, they protested state violence. This was also the year when the peaceful protest known as the “Prague Spring” flourished in Czechoslovakia, when Martin Luther King planned a Poor People’s March on Washington, and when Robert Kennedy ran for president. But the backlash against all of these stirrings was fierce. King and Kennedy were gunned down. Soviet tanks crushed the Prague Spring. Disarray in the American peace movement allowed Richard Nixon to become president. This documentary combines riveting archival footage and insightful interviews—with Jesse Jackson, Barbara Ehrenreich, Carlos Fuentes, Pat Buchanan and others—to recreate an extraordinary year. The emerging picture is one of turmoil and anguish…

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Talk: Research Services in the Labor Movement
Samir Sonti

November 16, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Samir Sonti, UNITE-HERE Local 11 Sonti took his Ph.D. at UCSB in 2016 with a dissertation entitled "The Price of Prosperity: Inflation and the Limits of the New Deal Order." He is a research analyst in a trade union local representing 23,000 workers employed in hotels, restaurants, airports, sports arenas, and convention centers throughout Southern California and Arizona. This event is a part of Organizing U.S. Capitalism: From the Federal Reserve to the Unions, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: The View from the Edge of Modernity
Rabbi Ed Feinstein

November 19, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Rabbi Ed Feinstein, Valley Beth Shalom Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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December 2018

Talk: Neoliberalism Before Its Time? Labor and the Free Trade Ideal in the Era of the “Great Compression”
Leon Fink

December 7, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Leon Fink, History, Georgetown Fink, the editor of LABOR: Studies in Working-Class History, is the author or editor of a dozen books.  These include The Long Gilded Age: American Capitalism and the Lessons of a New World Order (2014); Sweatshops at Sea: Merchant Seamen in the World's First Globalized Industry, from 1812 to the Present (2011);  The Maya of Morganton: Work and Community in the Nuevo New South (2003); and Progressive Intellectuals and the Dilemmas of Democratic Commitment (1997). This event is a part of Organizing U.S. Capitalism: From the Federal Reserve to the Unions, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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January 2019

Taubman Symposium Talk: Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s
Marc Dollinger

January 14, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Santa Barbara Hillel, 781 Embarcadero del Mar

Marc Dollinger, San Francisco State University Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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Film Screening and Q&A with Professor S.B. Diagne
Souleymane Bachir Diagne

January 15, 2019 @ 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
1920 Buchanan, UC Santa Barbara

Professor Diagne will be the guest speaker at a screening of two landmark Senegalese films: Ousmane Sembène's Borom Sarret (1963) and Djibril Diop Mambéty's La Petite Vendeuse de soleil (1999), followed by a Q&A with Professor Eric Prieto. Borom Sarret The first film directed by Senegal’s greatest filmmaker, Ousmane Sembène, Borom Sarret tells the story of a cart-driver who goes to Dakar to make a living, but out of sympathy with other poverty-stricken people, works for free and goes hungry himself. The genesis of Black African cinema can be traced to this short, stark masterpiece in Wolof and French, which conveys the toll of natural loss, poverty, and the stain of European colonization on Africa. La Petite Vendeuse de soleil “The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun” is a short drama film directed by Djibril Diop Mambéty, Senegal’s avant-garde filmmaker.…

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Talk: Translation and Decolonization
Souleymane Bachir Diagne

January 17, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In the colonial space, one imperial language presents itself as the Logos incarnate, in contrast to the local indigenous vernaculars which are then deemed lacking and incomplete. How the act of translation, of “putting in touch” languages (Antoine Berman, The Experience of the Foreign), creates linguistic equality and reciprocity, even in a colonial situation, is the topic of this presentation. Souleymane Bachir Diagne is a professor at Columbia University in the departments of French and Philosophy. He is currently the Director of the Institute of African Studies. His areas of research and publication include History of Philosophy, History of Logic and Mathematics, Islamic Philosophy, and African Philosophy and Literature. His latest publications in English include: Islam and the Open Society: Fidelity and Movement in the Philosophy of Muhammad Iqbal, Codesria, 2010; African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson, and the Idea…

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Talk: Mapping the Slave Trade
Gregory O’Malley

January 18, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Gregory O’Malley, History, UC Santa Cruz O’Malley is author of Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619-1807 (2014), a study of the logistics of distribution of human chattel among the American colonies. This event is a part of Commodities in Motion: Global, Local, Engendered and Enslaved, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: Seeking Lions: An Afternoon with Kenneth Bonert
Kenneth Bonert

January 27, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Kenneth Bonert Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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Film Screening: In the Shadow of the Moon

January 30, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

2019 marks the 50th anniversary of NASA’s Apollo program. The mission’s crewed flights began in 1968 with the first lunar circumnavigation; on July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong became the first human to step foot on another planet. By the end of 1972 Apollo’s funding was cut short and NASA’s moon explorations were over. From 1969 to 1972 there were eight crewed missions and 12 astronauts walked on the surface of the moon, exploring and doing scientific work “for the benefit of all mankind.” This award-winning documentary explores remastered archival footage and the recollections and commentary of almost every astronaut alive in 2007 regarding their participation in the Apollo program. Note the determination and awe that echoes through the memories of these unique Americans. Learn what they thought about the tumultuous decade of the 1960s and how their accomplishment seemed to…

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February 2019

Talk: Feminist Commodity Chains
Priti Ramamurthy

February 1, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Priti Ramamurthy, Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, University of Washington A scholar of gender and globalization, Ramamurthy has conducted ethnography in the same villages in the Telangana region of southern India for three decades to examine the relationship between social reproduction of families and agricultural transformation. She is co-editor and co-author of The Modern Girl Around the World : Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization (2008). This event is a part of Commodities in Motion: Global, Local, Engendered and Enslaved, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: The Weight of Ink
Rachel Kadish

February 4, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Rd.

Rachel Kadish Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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50th Anniversary Conference El Plan de Santa Barbara

February 22, 2019 @ 9:00 am - February 23, 2019 @ 6:00 pm

The 50th Anniversary Conference El Plan de Santa Barbara will commemorate one of the seminal proclamations of the Chicano Movement of the late 1960s and 1970s.  The Chicano Movement was the largest and most widespread civil rights and empowerment movement by Mexican Americans.  El Plan was drafted at a conference held at UCSB in April of 1969.  It laid the foundation for the establishment of Chicano Studies at UCSB and elsewhere.  It also unified the Chicano student movement under one name: MEChA.  Panels and speakers will address the history of El Plan but also its relevance today. Feb. 22 the conference will be in 6020 HSSB, McCune Conference Room and Feb. 23 at the MultiCultural Center (MCC) Sponsored by Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies | Chicano Studies Institute | Office of the Chancellor | College of Letters & Science…

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Talk: Intimate Labor in the Early Republic
April Haynes

February 22, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

April Haynes, History, University of Wisconsin Haynes is the author of Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth-century America (2015) and the forthcoming Tender Traffic: Intimate Labors in the Early American Republic. She is the chair of the Program in Gender and Women’s History at the University of Wisconsin. This event is a part of Commodities in Motion: Global, Local, Engendered and Enslaved, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: The Three Cantors
Cantor Marc Childs, Cantor Marcus Feldman, and Cantor Shmuel Barzilai

February 24, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Rd.

Cantor Marc Childs (Congregation B'nai B'rith, Santa Barbara) Cantor Marcus Feldman and Organist Aryell Cohen (Sinai Temple, Los Angeles) and Cantor Shmuel Barzilai (Chief Cantor of the Vienna Jewish Community) Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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March 2019

Talk: Commodities in Motion
Kashia Arnold

March 1, 2019 @ 1:00 am - 3:00 pm

Kashia Arnold, History, UCSB Arnold’s dissertation research examines the transformations of the regional economy of the Pacific basin caused by World War I and the booming American commodity demand that accompanied it. This event is a part of Commodities in Motion: Global, Local, Engendered and Enslaved, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

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Taubman Symposium Talk: The Strange Stories of Yiddishland: What the Yiddish Press Reveals about the Jews
Eddy Portnoy

March 3, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Eddy Portnoy, Ph.D., Yivo Institute for Jewish Research Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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Roma: A Symposium
Eloi Grasset Morell, Kate Bruhn, Víctor Fuentes, Ellen McCracken, Mario T. García

March 8, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Join faculty from the Departments of Chicana/o Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, and Political Science for a discussion of Alfonso Cuarón’s groundbreaking new film Roma. Free and open to the public Sponsored by the IHC Research Group on Latino Studies

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April 2019

Talk: “The Perfect Model for the 1990s”: Community Development Banking, Market-Based Solutions, and Democratic Neoliberalism
Lily Geismer

April 12, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Lily Geismer, History, Claremont McKenna College Geismer is currently on her second book, Doing Good: The Democrats and Neoliberalism from the War on Poverty to the Clinton Foundation. She is co-editor of Shaped by the State: Toward a New Political History of the Twentieth Century (2019) and author of Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party (2015). This event is a part of Molding Development in the Democratic State, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.history.ucsb.edu/labor

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Taubman Symposia Talk: Arthur Szyk: Soldier in Art
Irvin Ungar

April 14, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Arthur Szyk often said, “Art is not my aim, it is my means.” Yet, his contemporaries praised him as the greatest illuminator-artist since the 16th century. He saw himself as a fighting artist, enlisting his pen and paintbrush as his weapons against hatred, racism, and oppression before, during, and after World War II. As the leading anti-Nazi artist in America during the War, Szyk also created the important and widely circulated art for the rescue of European Jewry. His Passover Haggadah has been acclaimed as “worthy of being considered as one of the most beautiful books ever produced by the hand of man.” In this talk, Irvin Ungar will expose the viewer to the breadth and depth of the power, purpose, and persuasion of the great artist and the great man, Arthur Szyk. Books will be available for purchase and…

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Taubman Symposia Screening: Film Marking Yom ha-Shoa

April 28, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Pollock Theater, University of California, Santa Barbara

Film screening marking Yom ha-Shoa Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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May 2019

Taubman Symposia Screening: Film Marking Yom ha-Shoa

May 2, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Pollock Theater, University of California, Santa Barbara

Film screening marking Yom ha-Shoa Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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Talk: Boundaries of the Firm, State, and Nation: The Problem of Public Utility in the American Century
James T. Sparrow

May 3, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

James T. Sparrow, History, University of Chicago. Sparrow is the author of Warfare State: World War II Americans and the Age of Big Government (2011) and co-editor of Boundaries of the State in US History (2015). His current projects include Sovereign Discipline: The American Extraterritorial State in the Atomic Age and New Leviathan: Rethinking Sovereignty and Political Agency after Total War. This event is a part of Molding Development in the Democratic State, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.history.ucsb.edu/labor

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6th Annual GCLR Conference: Memory and Movement
Keynote: Michael Rothberg

May 4, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 6:00 pm

The Graduate Center for Literary Research (GCLR), in collaboration with UCSB’s Memory Studies Reading Group, is hosting an interdisciplinary conference examining the interplay between memory and movement through a wide range of perspectives and disciplines. Michael Rothberg will deliver the keynote address on "The Implicated Subject: Art, Activism, and Historical Responsibility." Arguing that the familiar categories of victim, perpetrator, and bystander do not adequately account for our connection to injustices past and present, Rothberg offers a new theory of historical responsibility through the figure of the implicated subject. Implicated subjects occupy positions aligned with power and privilege without being themselves direct agents of harm; they contribute to, inhabit, inherit, or benefit from regimes of domination but do not originate or control such regimes. Drawing on his forthcoming book The Implicated Subject: Beyond Victims and Perpetrators, Rothberg will discuss examples of…

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Talk: Towards a Palestinian Third Cinema
Nadia Yaqub

May 8, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In the 1970s, the filmmakers Masao Adachi and Jean-Luc Godard each created a sophisticated essay film that used the Palestinian revolution to reflect questions of truth, representation, media circuits, and the relationships that can and cannot be formed through them. This talk shifts attention away from these well-known works to focus on the films Palestinians themselves were making at this time, exploring how they engaged differently with the ideas that animated Adachi and Godard, as well as those articulated in the third cinema texts of Latin American filmmakers.   Nadia Yaqub (PhD University of California, Berkeley, 1999), is professor of Arabic language and culture in the department of Asian studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research addresses film, gender, and literature from the Arab world. She is the author of Pens, Swords, and the Springs…

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Talk: “Sold by her Own Desire”: Intimate Labor, Commodification, and Resistance in Female Intelligence Offices, 1810-1850
April Haynes

May 10, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

April Haynes, History, University of Wisconsin, Haynes is the author of Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth-century America (2015) and the forthcoming Tender Traffic: Intimate Labors in the Early American Republic. She is the chair of the Program in Gender and Women’s History at the University of Wisconsin. This event is a part of Molding Development in the Democratic State, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.history.ucsb.edu/labor

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Taubman Symposia Talk: Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History

May 13, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Steven Zipperstein, Stanford University Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies

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Talk: The Cold War’s Killing Fields: Rethinking the Long Peace
Paul Thomas Chamberlin

May 15, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Paul Thomas Chamberlin argues that the Cold War, long regarded as a mostly peaceful, if tense, diplomatic standoff between the West and East blocs, fostered a series of deadly conflicts that killed millions on battlegrounds across the postcolonial world. For half a century, as an uneasy accord hung over Europe, ferocious wars raged in the Cold War’s killing fields, resulting in more than fourteen million dead—victims who remain largely forgotten. In chronicling this violent history, Professor Chamberlin proposes a new geography and periodization and explores the lasting political impact of mass violence after 1945.   Paul Thomas Chamberlin is Associate Professor of History at Columbia University. His first book, The Global Offensive: The United States, the Palestine Liberation Organization, and the Making of the Post-Cold War Order, was published by Oxford University Press in 2012. His most recent book, The Cold…

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Talk: From Farm to Tourist Trap: Tourism as a Rural Development Strategy
Doug Genens

May 17, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Doug Genens, History, UCSB Genens, a PhD candidate in the UCSB Department of History, is writing a dissertation on the varieties of rural development in the United States after World War II. This event is a part of Molding Development in the Democratic State, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.history.ucsb.edu/labor

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Talk: The Social Origins of the Minimum Wage
Kathryn Sklar

May 24, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Kathryn Sklar, Berkeley, CA Sklar, who taught history for many years at SUNY Binghamton, is author of Catharine Beecher: A Study in American Domesticity (1973) and Florence Kelley and the Nation's Work: The Rise of Women's Political Culture, 1830-1900 (1995), both of which received the Berkshire Prize. She has received fellowships from the Ford, Rockefeller, Guggenheim, and Mellon Foundations, as well as from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Center for Advanced Study in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. This event is a part of Molding Development in the Democratic State, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.history.ucsb.edu/labor

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October 2019

Talk: Citizen Brown: Race, Democracy, and Inequality in the St. Louis Suburbs
Colin Gordon

October 11, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Colin Gordon, History, University of Iowa Gordon is an historian of U.S. public policy, political economy, and urban history. He is the author of Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City (2008), Dead on Arrival: The Politics of Health in Twentieth Century America (2003) and New Deals: Business, Labor, and Politics, 1920-1935 (1994). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Talk: A Fabulous Failure: Bill Clinton, American Capitalism, and the Origin of Our Troubled Times
Nelson Lichtenstein

October 15, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Nelson Lichtenstein, History, UC Santa Barbara Lichtenstein is the Academic Senate’s 2019 Faculty Research Lecturer. He is the author of Walter Reuther: The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit (1996); The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (2009), and co-editor of Beyond the New Deal Order: From the Great Depression to the Great Recession (2019). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Talk: The Pyramid Problem: Regulating Direct Sales at the Edges of Labor and Consumption, 1972-1982
Bernhard Reiger

October 25, 2019 @ 1:00 am - 3:00 pm

Bernhard Reiger, History, University of Leiden Reiger’s research examines European history within a comparative and transnational framework. His publications include Technology and the Culture of Modernity in Britain and Germany, 1890-1945 (2009) and The People’s Car: A Global History of the Volkswagen Beetle (2013). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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November 2019

Talk: A New Deal Voting Rights Case: A Strategy of the Roosevelt Justice Department, 1939-1941
Eric Rauchway

November 8, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Eric Rauchway, History, UC Davis Rauchway is the author of Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt’s America (2003); The Money Makers: How Roosevelt and Keynes Ended the Depression, Defeated Fascism, and Secured a Prosperous Peace (2015); and Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash over the New Deal (2018). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Talk: Economic Policy and the Civil Rights Struggle for Guaranteed Jobs
David Stein

November 22, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

David Stein, African American Studies, UCLA A UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Stein is the author of the forthcoming book, Fearing Inflation, Inflating Fears: The Civil Rights Struggle for Full Employment and the Rise of the Carceral State, 1929-1986. This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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March 2020

Talk: The Class Politics of Inflation and Postwar Wage and Price Controls
Andrew Elrod

March 6, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Andrew Elrod is a PhD candidate in the History Department at UC Santa Barbara. He is a historian of American capitalism and economic thought who has published in the New Labor Forum, Jacobin, and Dissent. His talk will examine the responses of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations to the problems of inflation and price controls in the 1960s and 1970s. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy

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