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The Center for Cold War Studies and International History

Today

TALK: The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the American Family

McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA

Prior to World War II, international adoption was virtually unknown, but in the twenty-first century, it has become a common practice, touching almost every American. How did the adoption of foreign children by U.S. families become an essential part of American culture in such a short period of time? Rachel Rains Winslow investigates this question, following the trail from Europe to South Korea and then to Vietnam. The Best Possible Immigrants shows how a combination ...

Screening: 1968: The Year That Shaped a Generation

McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA

1968 was a pivotal year in U.S. and global history. In the United States, students protested the Vietnam War. In France, they protested university conditions and sparked worker strikes across the country. In Mexico City, they protested state violence. This was also the year when the peaceful protest known as the “Prague Spring” flourished in Czechoslovakia, when Martin Luther King planned a Poor People’s March on Washington, and when Robert Kennedy ran for president. But ...

Talk: Towards a Palestinian Third Cinema

McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA

In the 1970s, the filmmakers Masao Adachi and Jean-Luc Godard each created a sophisticated essay film that used the Palestinian revolution to reflect questions of truth, representation, media circuits, and the relationships that can and cannot be formed through them. This talk shifts attention away from these well-known works to focus on the films Palestinians themselves were making at this time, exploring how they engaged differently with the ideas that animated Adachi and Godard, as ...

Talk: The Cold War’s Killing Fields: Rethinking the Long Peace

McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA

Paul Thomas Chamberlin argues that the Cold War, long regarded as a mostly peaceful, if tense, diplomatic standoff between the West and East blocs, fostered a series of deadly conflicts that killed millions on battlegrounds across the postcolonial world. For half a century, as an uneasy accord hung over Europe, ferocious wars raged in the Cold War’s killing fields, resulting in more than fourteen million dead—victims who remain largely forgotten. In chronicling this violent history, ...