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October 2019

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Lion King (2019)

October 14, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Lion King (2019) at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Talk: A Fabulous Failure: Bill Clinton, American Capitalism, and the Origin of Our Troubled Times
Nelson Lichtenstein

October 15, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Nelson Lichtenstein, History, UC Santa Barbara Lichtenstein is the Academic Senate’s 2019 Faculty Research Lecturer. He is the author of Walter Reuther: The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit (1996); The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (2009), and co-editor of Beyond the New Deal Order: From the Great Depression to the Great Recession (2019). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Research Focus Group Talk: Approaching Classical Chinese Poetry in Early Modern Japan: Intralingual and Interlingual Translation Strategies in Japanese “Remarks on Poetry”
Matthew Fraleigh

October 18, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
4080 HSSB, HSSB UCSB

Residents of the Japanese archipelago have been avid readers of classical Chinese texts in a great many genres from the very origins of literacy down to the present day. To varying degrees over the centuries, they have also been enthusiastic creators of such texts. This talk examines how authors from the latter half of the early modern period (1603–1868) conceptualized and discussed the reception and composition of Sinitic poetry. What strategies did they use to make Sinitic poetry intelligible to a readership that did not speak Chinese? How did they understand these practices, and how should we think about them? What do their writings tell us about how they perceived the borders between the Japanese and Chinese languages? Matthew Fraleigh is Associate Professor of East Asian Literature and Culture at Brandeis University. His research concerns the literature of early modern…

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Good Boys

October 18, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Good Boys at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Government Show

October 18, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability: Government Show Friday, October 18th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Good Boys

October 21, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Good Boys at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Public Forum: Building a Green New Deal: Community, Coalition, and Organizing for Environmental Justice

October 24, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

In communities, classrooms, and protest sites across the country, people have embraced the call for a Green New Deal as a way of recognizing that climate change presents us with an unprecedented historic challenge—and the need for comprehensive and transformational reform. California’s Central Coast has a powerful tradition of grassroots activism to draw on in rising to the challenge, from the wide-ranging environmental movement sparked by the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill to the multi-racial labor, immigrant, and indigenous people’s rights organizations leading the struggle for economic justice region-wide. Together, these and allied organizations have formed the Central Coast Climate Justice Network, a regional coalition dedicated to developing a collective vision and coalitional strategy for achieving holistic and intersectional environmental justice in our region. Featuring presentations from Network member organizations, the aim of the forum is to launch a broad,…

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Talk: The Pyramid Problem: Regulating Direct Sales at the Edges of Labor and Consumption, 1972-1982
Bernhard Reiger

October 25, 2019 @ 1:00 am - 3:00 pm

Bernhard Reiger, History, University of Leiden Reiger’s research examines European history within a comparative and transnational framework. His publications include Technology and the Culture of Modernity in Britain and Germany, 1890-1945 (2009) and The People’s Car: A Global History of the Volkswagen Beetle (2013). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Horror-thon

October 25, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability: Horror-thon Friday, October 25th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Crawl

October 28, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Crawl at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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UCHRI Funding Opportunities Information Sessions
Shana Melnysyn

October 30, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

9:30 am - 11:00 am - Faculty Funding Panel 11:15 am - 12:00 pm - Graduate Funding Panel Shana Melnysyn, Research Grants Manager at the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI), will host information sessions for faculty and graduate students who want to learn more about UCHRI's grant opportunities. Each session will include time for audience Q&A. The Faculty Funding Session (9:30-11 am) will include a panel on tips for crafting successful proposals with previous UCHRI faculty award winners: Abdulhamit Arvas (Theater and Dance), Susan Derwin (Comparative Literature and German), and Sherene Seikaly (History). Come learn about UCHRI funding opportunities and best practices for successful grant applications.

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November 2019

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Student Films

November 1, 2019
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of student films (time TBD)

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Eco-Friendly Show

November 1, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability: Eco-Friendly Show Friday, November 1st at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Student Films

November 4, 2019
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of student films (time TBD)

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Talk: A New Deal Voting Rights Case: A Strategy of the Roosevelt Justice Department, 1939-1941
Eric Rauchway

November 8, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Eric Rauchway, History, UC Davis Rauchway is the author of Murdering McKinley: The Making of Theodore Roosevelt’s America (2003); The Money Makers: How Roosevelt and Keynes Ended the Depression, Defeated Fascism, and Secured a Prosperous Peace (2015); and Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash over the New Deal (2018). This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Spider-Man: Far From Home

November 8, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Spider-Man: Far From Home at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Gold Show

November 8, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability: Gold Show Friday, November 8th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Rocky Horror Picture Show

November 8, 2019 @ 11:30 pm - November 9, 2019 @ 2:00 am
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showing of Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Spider-Man: Far From Home

November 11, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Spider-Man: Far From Home at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Screening and Panel Discussion: Surviving Home

November 12, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

SURVIVING HOME is an intimate documentary that follows four U.S. military veterans from different generations over an eight year period as they rebuild their lives after war. Interwoven with veterans' voices from across the country, their unique paths of healing and transformation shed light on longterm consequences of war and raise questions about the roots of war and societal cycles of violence. A severely injured Iraq War veteran discovers a new voice that helps heal his wounds of war, as he and his wife struggle to keep their marriage alive. A Vietnam War veteran becomes a Buddhist monk in an effort to come to terms with the carnage and dehumanization of combat. A female Iraq War veteran fights through the effects of Military Sexual Trauma to take on the U.S. government in a class action lawsuit that could improve the…

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The Lawrence Badash Memorial Lecture Series: Einstein’s War: How World War I Made Relativity
Matthew Stanley

November 13, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Einstein’s ascent to worldwide celebrity was, in large part, not his own doing. The 1919 confirmation of the German Einstein’s theory of general relativity by British astronomers soon after the end of the First World War made him an emblem of how science could rise above nationalism and petty patriotism.  But in fact international science – and relativity with it – was nearly shattered by the war. It was only the dedicated efforts of pacifist scientists, chiefly A.S. Eddington, that pulled both Einstein and his theory from behind the trenches and onto the front pages of newspapers around the globe. Matthew Stanley teaches and researches the history and philosophy of science. He holds degrees in astronomy, religion, physics, and the history of science and is interested in the connections between science and the wider culture. He is the author of…

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ready or Not

November 15, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ready or Not at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Wrestlemania

November 15, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: Wrestlemania Friday, November 15th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Ready or Not

November 18, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Ready or Not at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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Critical Mass Talk: Ady Barkan: Love and Death, Hope and Resistance
Ady Barkan

November 21, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Sitting in that hotel armchair, I realized that my deadly disease was giving me newfound power at the very moment it was depriving me of so much strength. My voice was growing softer, but I was being heard by more people than ever before. My legs were disintegrating, but more and more people were following in my footsteps. Precisely because my days were numbered, people drew inspiration from my decision to spend them in resistance. Precisely because I faced such obstacles, my comrades were moved by my message that struggle is never futile. In this talk, the paralyzed political activist Ady Barkan will explore the existential questions that he has faced in the wake of his terminal diagnosis with ALS, and that the American people have faced under the Trump administration: What kind of life will our children have, and…

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Talk: Economic Policy and the Civil Rights Struggle for Guaranteed Jobs
David Stein

November 22, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

David Stein, African American Studies, UCLA A UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow, Stein is the author of the forthcoming book, Fearing Inflation, Inflating Fears: The Civil Rights Struggle for Full Employment and the Rise of the Carceral State, 1929-1986. This event is a part of The Political Economy of Racial Inequality, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program. Pre-circulated papers available at www.labor.history.ucsb.edu/

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood

November 22, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical

November 22, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical Friday, November 22nd at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood

November 25, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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December 2019

Humanities Decanted: Borges, Buddhism and World Literature: A Morphology of Renunciation Tales
Dominique Jullien

December 5, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Dominique Jullien (French and Comparative Literature) and Sowon Park (English) about Jullien’s new book, Borges, Buddhism and World Literature: A Morphology of Renunciation Tales. Refreshments will be served. Jullien’s latest book follows the renunciation story in Borges and beyond, arguing for its centrality as a Borgesian compositional trope and as a Borgesian prism for reading a global constellation of texts. The renunciation story at the heart of Buddhism, that of a king who leaves his palace to become an ascetic, fascinated Borges because of its cross-cultural adaptability and metamorphic nature, and because it resonated so powerfully across philosophy, politics and aesthetics. From the story and its many variants, Borges’s essays formulated a 'morphological' conception of literature (borrowing the idea from Goethe), whereby a potentially infinite number of stories were generated by transformation of a…

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Magic Lantern Films Presents: IT Chapter Two

December 6, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of IT Chapter Two at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

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IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show

December 6, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show Friday, December 6th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

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January 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Nations in Crisis, People in Crisis: Connecting Upheaval
Jared Diamond

January 15, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Nations that successfully navigate crises do so by making selective changes to their identities and actions. When individuals experience crises—mid-life, financial, health, relationship—they may also adopt selective changes to overcome the situation. But some individuals, like some nations, are better at navigating upheaval than others. By drawing on the factors that counselors and psychotherapists have identified that affect the likelihood of overcoming personal crisis, Diamond will examine the extent to which crisis response on the individual scale helps us to understand the outcomes of recent and impending national and world crises. Jared Diamond is professor of Geography at UCLA and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Collapse, and other books. Copies of Diamond's books will be available for purchase and signing. Sponsored by the IHC’s Critical Mass series Image: Kinuko Y. Craft

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April 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Notes on the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration
Reuben Jonathan Miller

April 16, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

While more people are incarcerated in the United States than in any other nation in the history of the western world, the prison is but one (comparatively) small part of a vast carceral landscape. The 600,000 people released each year join nearly 5 million people already on probation or parole, 12 million who are processed through a county jail, 19 million U.S. adults estimated to have a felony conviction, and the staggering 79 million Americans with a criminal record. But the size of the U.S. carceral state is second in consequence to its reach. Incarcerated people are greeted by more than 48,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions upon release that limit their participation in the labor and housing markets, in the culture and civic life of the city, and even within their families. They are subject to rules other people…

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The 2020 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence: Jesmyn Ward

April 29, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

MacArthur Genius and two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward has been called “the new Toni Morrison” (American Booksellers Association). In 2017, she became the first woman and first person of color to win the National Book Award twice—joining the ranks of William Faulkner, Saul Bellow, John Cheever, Philip Roth, and John Updike. Her writing, which encompasses fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, is “raw, beautiful, and dangerous” (The New York Times Book Review). Ward’s novels, primarily set on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast, are deeply informed by the trauma of Hurricane Katrina. Salvage the Bones, winner of the 2011 National Book Award, is a troubling but ultimately empowering tale of familial bonds set amid the chaos of the hurricane. Ward’s memoir, Men We Reaped, deals with the loss of five young men in her life—to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that follows people…

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May 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited
Lizabeth Cohen

May 7, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities--in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the federal government responsible for funding more affordable housing and other urban investments, rather than turn to the private sector. Cohen will revisit this history by following the long career of Edward J. Logue, who worked to revitalize New Haven in the 1950s, became the architect of the “New Boston” in the 1960s, and later led innovative organizations in New York at the state level and in the South Bronx. She will analyze the evolution in Logue’s thinking and actions, when and how…

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