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October 2019

IHC Open House

October 3, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

You are invited to the IHC’s Open House on Thursday, October 3, from 4-6 pm. Cosponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center and the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. Meet new Humanities faculty, IHC fellows, and staff members. Learn about Critical Mass, our 2019-2020 public events series. Find out about our community-engagement programs and our numerous funding resources for faculty and graduate students. Enjoy good food, drink, and conversation.

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Conference: Modeling the Pacific: Oceanic Research in Science, Technology, and Humanities

October 10, 2019 @ 1:00 pm - October 12, 2019 @ 3:30 pm
Mosher Alumni Hall, Mosher Alumni House, UC Santa Barbara

MODELING THE PACIFIC: OCEANIC RESEARCH IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND HUMANITIES OCTOBER 10-12, 2019 MOSHER ALUMNI HALL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA The three-day conference brings together scholars from the sciences and humanities to discuss the history and function of modeling for our understanding of oceans, in general, and the Pacific Ocean, in particular. It aims at connecting scientific and engineering modes of dealing with oceans and marine life with approaches from media studies, history of science, and literature. Keynote: Naomi Oreskes Participants: Elena Aronova, Lisa Han, Stefan Helmreich, Sabine Höhler, Melody Jue, Sotiria Lampoudi, Eckart Meiburg, Tyler Morgenstern, Fabian Offert, John Durham Peters, Helen Rozwadowski, Tapio Schneider, Teresa Shewry, Samantha Stevenson, Douglas Steigerwald, Libe Washburn, et al. A cooperation of Germanic & Slavic Studies, UCSB and MECS (Media Cultures of Computer Simulations), Leuphana University Lüneburg Organized by: Wolf Kittler, Christina…

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Research Focus Group Talk: Daylighting Conflict: Board Games as Decision-Making Tools
Janette Kim

October 10, 2019 @ 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Janette Kim will join us to discuss Win-Win, a series of board games that play out climate risk scenarios. By designing interactions among players, objectives and resources, these games model the social justice implications of innovative financial and legal strategies. Equally important, they model the space of cities, offering unique ideas about the built environment in direct relationship to such dynamics. Together, these two interpretations of a ‘model’ serve as a new kind of decision-making tool—one that imagines new relationships among economies, publics and architectural design. Janette Kim is Assistant Professor of Architecture and Director of the Urban Works Agency at California College of the Arts, principal of design practice All of the Above, and founder of ARPA Journal. Her work spans across scholarship, research and design and focuses on political ecology and the built environment. Janette is author of…

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Critical Mass Inaugural Lecture: Plastic’s Tipping Point
Roland Geyer

October 10, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Plastic production, use, and pollution have been growing steadily for decades, without much public comment or concern. But suddenly, and very recently, there has been strong and widespread backlash against the pervasiveness of plastic. What prompted this sudden change in public opinion?  Did plastic pollution itself reach a tipping point?  Or did public attitudes toward this pollutant undergo a radical shift? Roland Geyer will discuss the history of global plastic production and disposal and will consider the future of both plastic and public outrage against its environmental impact. A reception will follow. Roland Geyer is a Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB. In his research he uses the approaches and methods of industrial ecology, such as life cycle assessment and material flow analysis, to assess pollution prevention strategies based on reuse, recycling, and material…

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UCHRI Funding Opportunities Information Sessions
Shana Melnysyn

October 30, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

9:30 am - 11:00 am - Faculty Funding Panel 11:15 am - 12:00 pm - Graduate Funding Panel Shana Melnysyn, Research Grants Manager at the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI), will host information sessions for faculty and graduate students who want to learn more about UCHRI's grant opportunities. Each session will include time for audience Q&A. The Faculty Funding Session (9:30-11 am) will include a panel on tips for crafting successful proposals with previous UCHRI faculty award winners: Abdulhamit Arvas (Theater and Dance), Susan Derwin (Comparative Literature and German), and Sherene Seikaly (History). Come learn about UCHRI funding opportunities and best practices for successful grant applications.

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November 2019

Film: “Surviving Home” Screening and Panel Discussion

November 12, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

SURVIVING HOME is an intimate documentary that follows four U.S. military veterans from different generations over an eight year period as they rebuild their lives after war. Interwoven with veterans' voices from across the country, their unique paths of healing and transformation shed light on longterm consequences of war and raise questions about the roots of war and societal cycles of violence. A severely injured Iraq War veteran discovers a new voice that helps heal his wounds of war, as he and his wife struggle to keep their marriage alive. A Vietnam War veteran becomes a Buddhist monk in an effort to come to terms with the carnage and dehumanization of combat. A female Iraq War veteran fights through the effects of Military Sexual Trauma to take on the U.S. government in a class action lawsuit that could improve the…

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The Lawrence Badash Memorial Lecture Series: Einstein’s War: How World War I Made Relativity
Matthew Stanley

November 13, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Einstein’s ascent to worldwide celebrity was, in large part, not his own doing. The 1919 confirmation of the German Einstein’s theory of general relativity by British astronomers soon after the end of the First World War made him an emblem of how science could rise above nationalism and petty patriotism.  But in fact international science – and relativity with it – was nearly shattered by the war. It was only the dedicated efforts of pacifist scientists, chiefly A.S. Eddington, that pulled both Einstein and his theory from behind the trenches and onto the front pages of newspapers around the globe. Matthew Stanley teaches and researches the history and philosophy of science. He holds degrees in astronomy, religion, physics, and the history of science and is interested in the connections between science and the wider culture. He is the author of…

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Critical Mass Talk: Ady Barkan: Love and Death, Hope and Resistance
Ady Barkan

November 21, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Sitting in that hotel armchair, I realized that my deadly disease was giving me newfound power at the very moment it was depriving me of so much strength. My voice was growing softer, but I was being heard by more people than ever before. My legs were disintegrating, but more and more people were following in my footsteps. Precisely because my days were numbered, people drew inspiration from my decision to spend them in resistance. Precisely because I faced such obstacles, my comrades were moved by my message that struggle is never futile. In this talk, the paralyzed political activist Ady Barkan will explore the existential questions that he has faced in the wake of his terminal diagnosis with ALS, and that the American people have faced under the Trump administration: What kind of life will our children have, and…

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April 2020

The 2020 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence: Jesmyn Ward

April 29, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

MacArthur Genius and two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward has been called “the new Toni Morrison” (American Booksellers Association). In 2017, she became the first woman and first person of color to win the National Book Award twice—joining the ranks of William Faulkner, Saul Bellow, John Cheever, Philip Roth, and John Updike. Her writing, which encompasses fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, is “raw, beautiful, and dangerous” (The New York Times Book Review). Ward’s novels, primarily set on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast, are deeply informed by the trauma of Hurricane Katrina. Salvage the Bones, winner of the 2011 National Book Award, is a troubling but ultimately empowering tale of familial bonds set amid the chaos of the hurricane. Ward’s memoir, Men We Reaped, deals with the loss of five young men in her life—to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that follows people…

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May 2020

Critical Mass Talk: Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited
Lizabeth Cohen

May 7, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities--in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the federal government responsible for funding more affordable housing and other urban investments, rather than turn to the private sector. Cohen will revisit this history by following the long career of Edward J. Logue, who worked to revitalize New Haven in the 1950s, became the architect of the “New Boston” in the 1960s, and later led innovative organizations in New York at the state level and in the South Bronx. She will analyze the evolution in Logue’s thinking and actions, when and how…

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